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Switch it Up and Save

February 02, 2010 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

The idea of saving money is the sole reason why people go to different stores for different items, if they know ahead of time they can spend less to get the same item. Why would prescriptions be any different, I suppose?

We at Medtipster.com encourage you to use our database to find the pharmacy with your specific prescription available on a pharmacy’s $4 generic program close to your home. If you’re taking several medications, this could mean you have several different pharmacy visits every month or every three months. It seems like it makes sense, but then again, does it have to be this way?

Pharmacies want your business. They want to keep you as a customer. Many offer gift cards and incentives to get you in there once, with every intention of keeping you. Next time you have a prescription, you’re already in the database, the pharmacy technician is familiar with your prescription history, and the hassle of a new pharmacy is obsolete. So, why wouldn’t they do what they have to do to keep you?

Price matching is something we hear all the time. This takes me back to my original question, why would prescriptions be any different, I suppose? They are not. Ask your pharmacy technician to match the price being offered at the next pharmacy! It can’t hurt to ask, and all they can say is, “no.”

Find your generics on Medtipster.com first then make a note of where the other generics are available on a generics program. Print the list, or go directly to the competing pharmacy and ask for a print out of the generic’s cost. Take that to the pharmacy of your choice and simply say, “I want to keep all of my prescriptions here, can you match the price of this competing pharmacy’s generic equivalent?”

Switch it up and save! Save time, gas money, and frustration.

Source: MSN Money http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SmartSpending/blog/page.aspx?post=1349052

Tylar Masters

Just say YES to (cheaper) drugs!

December 18, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

MedtipsterAmericans utilizing prescriptions could each save thousands of dollars if the senate would allow the importation of prescription drugs from Canada and Europe. Sounds great, so, yeah, when can we benefit from that?

Well, not today. Drugmakers win this battle. The possible influx of cheaper medicines is part of a large health care legislation, and the U.S. Senate voted 51-48 in opposition of this movement to loosen importation rules. But the war on prescription drugs isn’t over, and companies like Medtipster are accomplices to win the war.

What does this mean for us, the Americans, who feel the sting when we go to the pharmacy? It means we absolutely need to choose generic drugs over brand names. Generic drugs are the answer.

The issue is that many people do not know that their prescription may be available for even less than what they pay now, that being either their copay or $32.00, which is the average price of a generic drug. More importantly, where do they go to get that prescription on a generic program? Which pharmacy has that generic drug for just $4, or even less?

Medtipser.com has the answer to those questions.

Generic drug programs are available at most pharmacies, and most of their pharmacy websites have an available database or a download-able PDF of their generic drug lists. Medtipster understands what a hassle that can be for consumers, and created the database all in one location, www.medtipster.com. Pharmacy location, phone number, prescription price, even membership information at requiring pharmacies.

If you have trouble affording your medication, please contact us. We are here to help any way we can!

Resource, Bloomberg.com

Follow us on Twitter! www.twitter.com/medtipster.

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
www.medtipster.com

Get a Mile for an Inch

November 24, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

How to get the most out of your doctor’s appointment

We all know the drill… you show up for your doctor’s appointment, you wait X amount of minutes for the nurse to call your name, weigh in (always the fun part, I know), then step in to a room where you’re instructed to sit on an oversized paper gum wrapper and wait. Twenty minutes later, the doctor steps in to ask you about your symptoms, and in many cases, the doctor seems as though they are in a hurry. If you want to make sure you get the most from your doctor during that time, be sure you’re asking the right questions!

Make a list of items you want to discuss, brief your doctor on these items so the two of you can determine which items need to be addressed right away and which items can wait until your next appointment. Keeping a journal or notebook dedicated to health concerns, prescription questions, diet, exercise, etc. is a good idea.

Never be afraid to talk to your doctor about what’s really going on. As my own mother (who is a nurse) once told me, there really isn’t much a doctor hasn’t seen or experienced with another patient. If you’re not sure why your doctor is asking you a specific question, ask! Your doctor is there to help you, no matter how busy they seem to be.

Talk to the nurse at the nurse station before you go into your examination room. Just as the doctors are there to help you, so are their nurses. In many cases, the nurses can answer questions you have about your health. If for any reason they cannot answer a question for you, they will simply tell you that you will need to ask the doctor. Once you leave the examination room, feel free to ask any follow up questions with the nurse. Many times, the nurse will check with the doctor about your question before you leave to clear up any outstanding issues you thought of after leaving the examination room.

Remember that getting the most from your doctor’s time is all about communication. It’s also important to be honest when communicating with your doctor! Doctors go through all those years of education and hard work because they are passionate about healing and helping, YOU!

For more information and a specific list of common questions for your doctor, visit the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) website’s “Questions Are the Answer Series” at www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer/.

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
web address: www.medtipster.com

H1N1 Vaccine Now Available at 123 Locations in Ten States

November 05, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: H1N1 News, Medtipster

While many wait for the latest information from their local news source, Medtipster.com announces the following have the H1N1 vaccine available:

pathmark

Six Pathmark Supermarkets in NJ offer H1N1 vaccine

A & P Supermarket – 7 stores in New Jersey
Butlers Pharmacy – 1 store in New Jersey
Harmon’s Grocery Store – 9 stores in Utah
CVS’s Minute Clinics – 9 clinics in Florida, Virginia, Michigan, & Missouri
Pathmark Supermarket – 6 stores in New Jersey
Smith’s Food and Drug – 22 stores in Utah
Walmart’s Solantic Clinic – 3 clinics in Florida
Super Fresh Markets – 1 store in New Jersey
Walgreen’s Take Care Clinics – 42 stores in Tennessee, Florida, Nevada, Missouri, Washington & Ohio
Walgreen’s – 18 stores in Utah
Safeway – 2 stores in Washington
Medicap Pharmacy – 1 store in Washington
La Conner Drug – 1 store in Washington
Fred Meyer – 1 store in Washington

The stores with the vaccine available are currently in our database. If you live in one of the above mentioned areas, please visit http://medtipster.com/services.php?type=shots and select H1N1 from the drop down menu and enter you zip code for a list of the locations nearest you.

Continue to visit www.medtipster.com for updates as we receive information on more stores with the H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccines. Bookmark our home page, add us to your favorites, join our facebook fan page, follow us on twitter! Stay up to date with the latest news on healthcare with Medtipster.com!

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

Five Million, Six Hundred Fifty Six Thousand – But, Who’s Counting?

October 30, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: H1N1 News, Medtipster

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

The actual number of confirmed cases of swine flu could be nearly 140 times greater than originally reported.

The swine flu has everyone talking, and everyone concerned in one way or another. It’s a topic we hear about daily in the news. The shortage of the H1N1 vaccine has sent millions into a panic, especially those with young children or caretakers of elders, who are at the highest risk.

The number of laboratory confirmed cases from April 2009 to July 2009 is approximately 44,000 in the United States alone. But what if that number is completely inaccurate? How would that effect the supply of the H1N1 vaccine now that flu season is here and we’ve entered into the “fall swing” of the swine flu? Answer: Tremendously.

The truth is that the estimate could be off just a little. Like 5,656,000, but who’s counting? Well, every single concerned American for one! According to researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Harvard School of Public Health, the actual number of infected individuals in the United States is between 1.8 million and 5.7 million. That’s up to 140 times greater than the earlier reported 44,000 infected Americans.

The CDC and Harvard suggest that “health systems and infrastructure may be unprepared in the short-term if plans are based on a number of confirmed cases.” That being said, knowing the true number of confirmed cases seems like a high priority.

Resources: Bloomberg, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Harvard School of Public Health

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

New Link to Microsoft Powered H1N1 Response Center

October 29, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: H1N1 News, Medtipster

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

Helpful Link Directs Users to Microsoft Powered H1N1 Response Center

Medtipster.com has added a new feature to the website to help consumers determine if their symptoms align with seasonal flu or H1N1 swine flu. By clicking on the “Helpful Links” tab on the menu bar from any of Medtipster.com’s pages, the “Flu Self-Assessment,” licensed by Emory University, and powered by Microsoft, will walk consumers through a series of questions and will provide a suggestion as to whether the symptoms are flu-like or possibly another illness.

It’s always important to talk to your physician about your health concerns. Medtipster.com and Microsoft’s H1N1 Response Center does not provide medical advice and does not replace the advice of a healthcare professional. Medtipster.com and Microsoft cannot guarantee and is not responsible for the accuracy of the guidance for your situation. We encourage you to evaluate it carefully and take the following into consideration:

  • If you are worried about your health, call your doctor.
  • If you do not have a doctor, go to a walk-in clinic (Medtipster.com’s mini-clinic search will help you find one in your neighborhood)
  • If you think you have an emergency, call 9-1-1.

For more information on the seasonal flu or H1N1 swine flu, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at http://www.cdc.gov/.

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

Trick or Treat?

October 28, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

We’ve all asked that famous Halloween question, “trick or treat?” What we expect is some foil wrapped deliciousness, some sort of taste explosion in our mouths, not a $32.00 deduction from our bank account (otherwise known as “trick” in my opinion!)

I visited my doctor the week before Halloween back in 2007 because I had a terrible cough, sore throat, chest congestion and a fever. The doctor told me I had bronchitis, and wrote a prescription. On my way out, I grabbed a mini-snickers from the plastic orange pumpkin, thank goodness, because that was the only real “treat” I got out of the deal.

I told my doctor I didn’t have prescription insurance. He advised that he could call in my prescription to the pharmacy that was directly across the street from his practice and they would have the drug available for just $4.00. I was so relieved to hear this news! I drove over to the pharmacy, waited about 25 minutes for my order to be filled, while managing to steer clear of the temptation of wandering around the store buying several things I really didn’t need.

The pharmacist called my name, and I went to the counter to pay for my prescription. “Your total is $36.00,” she said. I replied, “oh, umm, I’m sure there’s a mix up, you see, my doctor told me this would be just $4.00 here.” You know, because doctors are always right, right? “No, this is the generic and it’s $36.00,” she repeated that price as if I was automatically supposed to know my total. I had no clue, and apparently neither did my doctor, that this particular pharmacy had no such drug at that price, nor any others for that matter.

You see, each pharmacy really does have its own list of generic prescriptions available on the $4.00 program. But who knows that? I sure didn’t. And my doctor clearly did not. I didn’t know there was even a way to know which pharmacies carried which drugs on their $4.00 programs. It can be very confusing to the average consumer, which is why Medtipster.com exists.

Stick with David Copperfield for your tricks and Medtipster.com for your treats!

Just for fun, the origination of Halloween’s famous question: http://tinyurl.com/yhe77e8

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

The Viral Infection of a Bad Hair Day

October 26, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

I got this new and really awesome haircut on Thursday and ladies, you know that feeling where you can’t wait to take a stab at replicating your new ‘do exactly the way your stylist did? It never tends to work out for me, but then add Friday’s humidity to the equation, and OMG*… my efforts were pointless. By noon, this so-called re-creation of my stylist’s looked more like something my cat Viktor coughed up.

I almost shared my bad-mood-as-a-direct-result-of-a-bad-hair-day with my 300+ facebook friends. But then I thought, “wait, is it really that bad?” I mean, I don’t have a cold sore, an ear infection, a bladder infection, toenail fungus, a zit with its own zip code, nope, nothing that bad. All I had was what I call “pony-tail syndrome.”

It got me thinking about how, with all the social media out there today, people are sharing information with each other and communicating like never before. I remember when my grandma would wait until Sunday to call us because Sprint had the $.10 a minute long distance on Sundays, remember? And we’d all get to hear about her corns and back pain the old fashioned way – via land line!

Everything on the internet has viral potential. But some things are better left non-viral! If I did have any of those problems I mentioned above, I wouldn’t share it with my friends! I would crawl into a cave, have my boyfriend send in food and water, and come out only when the problem is gone.

My point is this: How much personal information do your friends share with you? Do you know what prescriptions they might be taking right now, and for what? What if some of your friends are on daily medications and struggle to afford those every month? Would they tell you? For most people, it’s embarrassing to communicate about medical and/or financial problems.

Sharing is caring! Okay, except when it’s green and phlegm-like! But if you’re reading this, you’ve found a way to save on healthcare. Although everyone you know may not need it today, chances are there will be a day when they do need it. Share this with your friends today, because you never know if they will need it tomorrow.

* OMG is by far my favorite acronym to sarcastically throw into my blogs. It only works if you recite it as the letters and not what it actually stands for, throw in a head nod and speak like a high pitched valley girl. I truly hope someone finds as much humor in the sarcastic ways to use this acronym as I do.

To become a fan of Medtipster’s facebook page, follow the facebook icon on our website!

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

The Price is Right?

October 21, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

“Come on down!” Those are awfully familiar words to any “Price is Right” guru. Ever notice how the items being bid on are all brand names? It’s part of “branding,” and it works well if you’re targeting a fan of the CBS hit television show, even post-Bob Barker!

There’s a time and a place for brand names. I choose Kraft Macaroni and Cheese over the store brand, it’s my personal preference. Why? In my opinion, Kraft has a better product, and the difference is definitely noticeable. (Yes, it is the cheesiest!) I could save about $25 a year by choosing the store brand, which adds up to about $1,250 over my lifetime.

Now, this is crazy. The average person has one prescription per month, and the cost of the brand name prescription, on average, is $100.00. Let’s say from age 45 to age 68, a person spends this amount per month on the same brand name prescription. That’s $27,600! What? $27,600! Sorry, it was just SO worth repeating!

Now, let’s take this same person and factor in medtipster.com, where the same prescription is available in a generic form (which is an exact replica of the brand name) for only $4.00 per month. Now we’re talking! That’s just $1,104.00 over 23 years. While I’m sure you can do the math, basically the difference is, well, a new Honda Civic Hybrid, or two Kia Rios!

So you see, we’re not talking mac’n cheese any more. While “The Price is Right” for some purchases, it’s better to “come on down” on prescription drug spending.

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

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