The Official Medtipster Blog

have your healthcare and afford it, too
Subscribe

Are You Adhering to Your Prescription Drug Regimen?

March 28, 2013 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Adhering to medication means taking the medication correctly, as instructed by a health care professional. This includes filling and refilling the prescription, taking it regularly, and continuing to take it for as long as prescribed. While this may seem simple, the World Health Organization has reported an average medication adherence rate of only 50 percent for people with chronic illnesses in developed countries. So, why is only half of the population taking their medicines as prescribed? Moreover, why is it important to adhere to your medication regimen anyway? Read on to find out why it’s important and how you can improve your adherence.

Why Adherence Matters?

Simply put, it can improve your overall quality of life. Evidence suggests that for many chronic illnesses, higher medication adherence reduces hospital visits. Fewer visits to the hospital mean lower medical costs as well.

Adherence to medication may be ‘easier said than done’ for many people. There are a variety of barriers that may make it difficult for patients to follow their medication therapy. Here are a few of those barriers and suggestions for how to get around them.

Cost

Often times, patients just cannot afford their medications. Perhaps there are alternative drugs available that do not cost as much. Talk with your prescriber or pharmacist. They may be able to help you find a more affordable drug.

You can also visit the Medtipster website, www.medtipster.com, to determine the cost of a prescription. The tool can help you compare the price on related drug products.

Side Effects

Your medicine may trigger unpleasant side effects, causing you to stop taking it. Talk to your doctor about these side effects. They may be able to switch you to a different medicine to reduce the side effects. They may also have suggestions for minimizing the side effects. Your doctor has your best interest in mind and is a knowledgeable resource to help improve your quality of life.

Feeling Better

There are five pills left, but you started to feel better and decided to stop taking your medicine. Before you stop, talk to your prescriber. Stopping early may cause more health problems. For instance, if a patient has a bacterial infection and stops taking his or her medicine early, some bacteria may still be alive. These bacteria could start a whole new strain of resistant germs. (U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 2009). Even though you may feel better, try to continue to take your medicine(s).

Forgetfulness

Make taking your medicine a part of your daily routine. Once you are used to taking your medicines regularly, it will not seem like a burden on your lifestyle. Buying a pill minder dispenser may help; it’s an easy daily reminder to take your medicine. Write down a schedule of when to take your medicines or add it to the calendar on your electronic device.

Health Care Beliefs and Attitudes

Some patients hold certain beliefs or attitudes that stop them from being adherent to their medication regimen. For example, a patient may believe that taking a medication as prescribed will not lead to a predicted outcome or that a particular disease state is not significant or will not lead to severe untoward outcomes. Talk with your prescriber about your beliefs. He or she may have more information about your illness and medicine than you know.  Your prescriber can tell you why it is in your best interest to adhere to taking your medicine(s).

Adhering to your medicine can improve your overall quality of life, so take care to adhere to your prescribed medication regimen. For a better result, you will be glad you attended to your health.

Over-the-Counter versus Prescription Drugs

December 14, 2011 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: Navitus Clinical Journal – December 2011

Hundreds of drugs are available over the counter, including, but not limited to, cough and cold medications, pain relievers (aspirin, ibuprofen) and heartburn drugs. Over-the-Counter (OTC) drugs are drugs that you can buy without a prescription. Many of these drugs have been available for a very long time and have long track records for safety. Others are newer and often started out as prescription drugs. Some drugs that have become available as OTC in the past few years include heartburn drugs – Zantac, Pepcid, Prilosec OTC – and the allergy drug Claritin.

Why do drugs become OTC?
Drug manufacturers have an incentive to make their product(s) available OTC, since it is easier for patients to purchase a drug over the counter rather than via a prescription from their doctors. Because of the availability of OTCs, switching a drug to OTC can increase the drug manufacturer’s sales.

Drug manufacturers may also want to have their product available OTC as part of a larger strategy to protect and increase their profits. This usually happens when a prescription drug’s patent is about to expire. For example, when Prilosec’s patent expired, the manufacturer petitioned the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to make it available over the counter, while at the same time introducing a “new,” chemically similar prescription drug, Nexium.

Regulation and safety of OTCs
The FDA regulates OTC drugs, just as it regulates prescription drugs. The FDA decides whether to allow a drug to make the switch from prescription to OTC. To approve a drug as an over-the-counter drug, the FDA must find that:

  • Its benefits outweigh its risks. In other words, the improvements to the patient’s health from taking the drug are more valuable than any negative side effects.
  • Its potential for misuse and abuse is low. The drug should not be habit-forming and should not encourage people to overuse it.
  • Consumers can use the drug for self-diagnosed conditions. The drug is not intended for a condition that needs testing or a doctor’s diagnosis, such as high cholesterol. Instead, the drug treats a symptom that is obvious to the average consumer, such as headache or allergy.
  • The drug can be adequately labeled. The warnings and instructions for use are clear and easy to understand without any training.
  • The drug does not need a doctor’s supervision, and the drug is easy to use. For example, the drug does not need a doctor to monitor and change the dosage.

In general, the risks or side effects of OTCs are low, how to use them is clear, they treat conditions that patients can easily recognize, and they give consumers greater choices.

Are OTC’s less expensive than prescriptions?
It depends. OTCs may be covered by your plan sponsor. If that is the case, you may only need to pay a copay for these drugs. Depending on your plan sponsor’s plan design, the copay may be less expensive than the cost of the OTC. Alternatively, your plan sponsor may not cover the OTC you need, but it may cover a generic version of that drug. In this case, the generic version is likely less expensive than the OTC.

As dozens of blockbuster drugs begin to lose their patents in the next few years, we can expect to see more switches from prescription-only to OTC.

Atorvastatin – generic for Lipitor

September 14, 2011 By: PharmaSueAnn Category: Medtipster

Atorvastatin – generic for Lipitor is scheduled to be released on November 30, 2011. Although it will be quite a while before we see atorvastatin on a $4 list, it’s availability will allow many of us to see a reduction in prescription drug co-payments.

Almost Half of Americans Took a Prescription Drug in Past Month

September 03, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: Health Blog – Wall Street Journal Blogs, By Katherine Hobson – 9.02.10

The government today released some new stats on prescription-drug use through 2008. The headline finding: Over the previous decade, the proportion of Americans (of all ages) reporting they took a prescription drug in the past month rose to 48% from 44%.

Some other key findings:

The percentage of people reporting the use of multiple prescription drugs in the last month also rose, to 31% for two or more prescriptions and 11% (a near-doubling of the previous 6%)) for five or more drugs.

As you’d expect, prescription-drug use varied by age, with about 20% of kids under 12 and 90% of older Americans (defined as age 60 and over — sorry, Mom!) reporting the use of at least one drug in the past month.

Among the 60-plus crowd, more than 76% used at least two drugs in the past month and 37% used at least five. Of that finding — which stems, of course, from the fact that older folks often have multiple diseases — the report says that “excessive prescribing or polypharmacy is also an acknowledged safety risk for older Americans, and a continuing challenge that may contribute to adverse drug events, medication compliance issues and increased health-care costs.”

The type of drugs used most often were asthma meds for kids, central nervous system stimulants (such as those used to treat ADHD) for teens, antidepressants for the middle-aged and cholesterol-lowering drugs for older people.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the trade association for drug makers, said in a statement that “as we learn more about disease, prescription medicines are justifiably playing an increasingly important role.” The group noted that many patients still lack access to needed medications, and that in many cases early interventions and improved compliance would improve health outcomes. “The best solution for all patients is to strike the right medical balance between proper and effective use of prescription medicines and other therapies and interventions,” it said.

A few months back, the pharmacy-benefits manager Medco issued its own figures for prescription-drug use and spending, covering 2009. It reported that use among adults held fairly steady, edging up slightly among those over 65 and dropping a bit for those aged 50-64 — but use among those 19 and under rose by 5%.

Local pharmacies leery of Caterpillar Rx policy

July 09, 2010 By: Nadia Category: Free Prescriptions, HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: Winston-Salem Journal, 7.9.2010

A group of independent local pharmacies supports Caterpillar Inc. opening a plant in Winston-Salem, but not if it costs them customers.

That’s why they are appealing to city and county officials to make equal prescription-drug access to potential Caterpillar employees a part of any incentive package with the company.

The pharmacies are concerned about a preferred prescription-drug agreement that Caterpillar has with Walgreens and Wal-Mart.

The agreement, which runs through 2011, provides for lower or no co-pays for Caterpillar employees who fill their prescriptions with Walgreens and Wal-Mart. Employees pay more if they fill their prescriptions through an online or mail-order pharmacy, other chains or independent pharmacies.

“With Caterpillar’s policy, if one of our customers gets hired by Caterpillar, we could lose them,” said Dave Marley, the president and chief executive of Marley Drug in Winston-Salem.

“This, combined with the fact that our own tax dollars were used to entice Caterpillar, and it becomes wholly unacceptable.”

Caterpillar has named Winston-Salem as one of three finalists, along with Montgomery, Ala., and Spartanburg, S.C., for a proposed $426 million manufacturing plant with 510 company and contract employees.

Last week, Winston-Salem and Forsyth County offered Caterpillar a combined $23.4 million in incentives. Caterpillar plans to make a decision in August.

Marley said that the pharmacies are “willing to accept the exact same reimbursement terms given by Walgreens and Wal-Mart.”

“We feel there is no way this would be negotiated after the fact, so if there is going to be a change in Caterpillar’s policy, it has to be raised now and discussed now,” Marley said.

Also making the request are Andrews Pharmacy, East Winston Pharmacy, Gateway Pharmacy, Jonestown Pharmacy, Lewisville Drug, Medicap Pharmacy on Liberty Street and Medicap Pharmacy on Reynolda Road.

Mayor Allen Joines said the city “will bring this concern to the company’s attention if we are lucky enough to be negotiating a contract.”

At cathealthbenefits.cat.com, Caterpillar said the “direct contracts with Wal-Mart and Walgreens use a transparent cost-plus pricing methodology that is intended to eliminate unnecessary and hidden costs in the prescription-drug supply chain.”

Caterpillar did amend its policy to allow independent pharmacies to participate at the Walgreens and Wal-Mart tier in rural areas that don’t have easy access to those stores.

A small percentage of employers have adopted similar policies regarding prescription drugs, said Steve Graybill, a senior consultant for Mercer, a human-resources consulting company.

David Howard, a spokesman for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., said that in 2009, the manufacturer opened up its health-care plan to give employees access to more than 59,000 pharmacies, including national chains and many local pharmacies. Before that, Reynolds provided most medical care for its employees through company-sponsored clinics such as Winston-Salem Health Care.

The bulk of local Reynolds employees have still chosen to use Winston-Salem Health Care and its pharmacy for years, Howard said. “Employees have the option to go outside of network for health care and prescriptions, but they will have higher out-of-pocket costs,” Howard said.

Media General Inc., the parent company of the Winston-Salem Journal, has a contract with Medco, a mail-order pharmacy that provides discounts for employees, but employees can fill prescriptions elsewhere, as well.

Employer healthcare costs expected to rise 9% in 2011, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers

June 15, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: www.pwc.com – June 14, 2010

The nation’s employers can expect medical costs to increase by 9% in 2011, a decrease of 0.5% from the 2010 growth rate, according to the annual Behind the Numbers report published today by the PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) Health Research Institute. For the first time, the majority of the American workforce is expected to have a health insurance deductible of $400 or more, as more employers return to “indemnity style” cost-sharing by raising out-of-pocket limits, replacing co-pays with co-insurance and adding high-deductible health plans.

The Behind the Numbers report includes findings of the PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health and Well-Being Touchstone Survey of more than 700 employers from 30 industries, as well as interviews with health plan actuaries and other executives whose companies provide health insurance for 47 million American workers and their families.

Improving wellness programs and increased cost-sharing lead the planned changes employers will make in the benefit plan designs they will offer for next year. According to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Touchstone research:

  • Two-thirds (67%) of companies intend to expand or improve wellness programs inside the US
  • 42% intend to increase employee contributions for health insurance coverage.
  • 41% intend to increase medical cost-sharing, including higher deductibles and co-pays, while only 26% intend to increase prescription drug cost-sharing.
  • More employers are dropping health benefits for retirees. One-third of employers with over 5,000 workers subsidize pre-65 retiree medical coverage, down from 47% in 2009. Only 22% of employers with over 5,000 employees subsidize post-65 retiree medical coverage, down from 37% in 2009.

In 2011, the Behind the Numbers report outlines three primary deflators that will help employers hold down medical costs:

  • Employers are moving toward pre-managed care benefit design by increasing deductibles and replacing co-pays with co-insurance. By requiring workers to spend more out-of-pocket at the point of care, employers believe they will rein in utilization of services and drugs. The number of employers using co-insurance for physician visits has nearly doubled, and one-third use co-insurance for brand-name drugs.
  • Drug costs are tempered by generics. Insurers are benefitting from the growing use of generic drugs. Drugs representing about $26 billion in annual sales are expected to go off patent in 2011, including the world’s best-selling drug, Lipitor. Generics account for as much as 80% of all prescriptions.
  • COBRA costs are expected to return to more normal levels in 2011. COBRA subsidies passed by Congress in 2009 created a 1% increase in the medical cost trend, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ analysis. A combination of declining unemployment and expiration of the COBRA subsidies is expected to lead to reduced enrollment in COBRA.

The biggest inflators of the medical trend in 2011 will be in hospital and physician costs, which make up 81% of premium costs. 

  • Hospitals shifting costs from Medicare to private payers and employers is seen as the Number One reason for higher medical costs trends. In 2011, Medicare, which is the single largest payer for hospitals, will reduce payment rates to hospitals for the first time after seven years of increases that nearly matched or exceeded inflation increases. Some hospitals that benefitted from higher payments in 2008 and 2009 may be able to manage this type of cut by tapping their reserves. Yet, more are likely to shift more costs to commercial payers during their negotiations.
  • Provider consolidation is increasing, which is expected to increase their bargaining power. More physicians are getting out of private practice and joining forces with local hospitals or larger physician groups. The number of physicians involved in mergers or acquisitions in 2009 was 2,910, nearly twice that of 2008. There has been record consolidation activity in 2010, and PricewaterhouseCoopers expects the trend to accelerate in 2011. Payers expect to see more negotiating power and higher prices in the short term, though the benefits of consolidation should create efficiencies that moderate rate increases in the future.
  • Spurred by stimulus funding that begins in 2011 and Medicare penalties that begin in 2015, hospitals will invest billions of dollars in certified electronic health record (EHR) systems. While many hospital systems were planning to implement EHRs in the near future, the government’s new regulations dramatically condensed their timelines to invest in technology, IT staff, training and process redesign. Healthcare CIOs surveyed by PwC said they will make their largest investments to meet the new EHR regulations in 2011. In the long term, EHRs are expected to help control costs. 

“For more than 50 years, US employers have used health benefits as a critical part of their compensation package to recruit and retain workers,” said Michael Thompson, principal, Human Resource Services, PricewaterhouseCoopers. “The value of these benefits is becoming an even more visible part of overall compensation as medical costs grow, and, by 2014, health insurance benefits will shift from being a voluntary benefit to an individual mandate, enforced by new tax levies. Companies are now working with their health plan providers for new post-recession, post-health reform strategies to sustain their programs and promote health and well-being as their next competitive advantage.” 

Each year, PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute provides estimates on growth of private medical costs over the next year and what the leading drivers of the trend are expected to be. Insurance companies use medical cost trends to help set health plan premiums by estimating what the same health plan this year would cost in the next year. In turn, employers use the information to make adjustments in benefit plan design to help offset any cost increases. 

“Health reform delivers only a minor impact on the underlying medical cost trends in 2011 and introduces hundreds of changes in the healthcare system designed to reduce costs and improve efficiencies in the long-term,” said Kelly A. Barnes, US health industries leader at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “These changes could bring significant new cost savings opportunities for employers and payers as well as new choices and transparency for workers buying insurance.” 

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Behind the Numbers report and survey highlights are available at www.pwc.com/us/medicalcosts2011. The full findings of the PricewaterhouseCoopers 2010 Health and Well-being Touchstone survey are available at  www.pwc.com/us/touchstone2010.For more on the details on the implications of health reform, go to http://www.pwc.com/healthreform

Methodology

The 2010 Health and Well-Being Touchstone survey was completed in the first quarter of 2010. Survey participants included 700 U.S- based companies across the country from 30 different industries. Companies ranged in size from small employers with fewer than 500 employees to large companies with more than 20,000 employees. 

About PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute (HRI)

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute (www.pwc.com/hri) is an unparalleled resource for health industry expertise. By providing cutting-edge intelligence, perspective and analysis on issues impacting the health industry, HRI assists executive decision-makers and stakeholders worldwide in navigating their most pressing business challenges. PricewaterhouseCoopers is one of the only firms with a dedicated global healthcare research unit, capitalizing on fact-based research and collaborative exchange among our network of professionals with day-to-day experience in the health industries. 

About PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Industries Group

 PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Industries Group (www.pwc.com/healthindustries) is a leading advisor to public and private organizations across the health industry, including payers, providers, academic institutions, health sciences, biotech/medical devices, pharmaceutical companies, employers and new non-traditional market participants in the dynamic healthcare space. PricewaterhouseCoopers has a network of more than 4,000 professionals worldwide and 1,200 professionals in the US dedicated to the health industries.

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Industries’ clients include 40 of the top 100 hospitals in the US and 16 of the 18 best hospitals as ranked by US News & World Report; all 20 of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies; all of the top 20 commercial payers in the US; municipal, state and federal government agencies and many of the world’s preeminent medical foundations and associations. Follow PwC Health Industries at http://twitter.com/PwCHealth.

About PricewaterhouseCoopers
PricewaterhouseCoopers (www.pwc.com) provides industry-focused assurance, tax and advisory services to build public trust and enhance value for its clients and their stakeholders. More than 163,000 people in 151 countries across our network share their thinking, experience and solutions to develop fresh perspectives and practical advice.

“PricewaterhouseCoopers” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP or, as the context requires, the PricewaterhouseCoopers global network or other member firms of the network, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity.

© 2010 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. All rights reserved

 Lisa Stearns
The Hubbell Group, Inc.
Tel: +1 (781) 878 8882
lstearns@hubbellgroup.com

Prices Rising For Brand-Name Drugs In Coverage Gap

March 18, 2010 By: Nadia Category: Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Medtipster Source:  The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation – www.kff.org
Medicare Part D 2010 Data Spotlight: Prices for Brand-Name Drugs in the Coverage Gap
This analysis finds prices for some commonly used brand-name drugs rising in 2010 for beneficiaries who reach the coverage gap (or “doughnut hole”), with increases since 2006 far exceeding the growth in inflation.

The Part D benefit’s coverage gap generally requires enrollees to pay the full cost of their drugs after their total drug spending exceeds their initial coverage limit ($2,830 in 2010) until they reach the threshold for receiving catastrophic coverage ($6,440 in 2010).  In 2007, an estimated 3.4 million Part D enrollees reached the coverage gap.

Using data posted on the government’s Medicare.gov website, the analysis looks at prices for commonly used brand-name drugs without a generic substitute for enrollees in stand-alone prescription drug plans.  The prices reflect the amount that enrollees would pay for a 30-day supply after they reach the coverage gap and before catastrophic coverage begins.  

The spotlight is one in a series analyzing key aspects of the Medicare Part D drug plans that will be available to beneficiaries in 2010. These spotlights were prepared by a team of researchers at Georgetown University, NORC and the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Find generic equivalants and alternatives for commonly used brand-name drugs at www.medtipster.com.

Look No Further: Prescription Coupons Soon Online

January 28, 2010 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

If you’re searching for savings on brand name prescriptions, our user friendly and searchable database of coupons come straight from the manufacturer.

Many people have trouble affording their prescriptions, especially those without health insurance. In fact, one single prescription for a 30-day supply can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars. I’ve heard stories of people having to choose between their medications and groceries, and it breaks my heart to think of such dilemma. No one should have to make that choice!

There are ways you can save significant amounts of money on your prescriptions, and I’m not just shouting Medtipster.com here. The growth of internet coupons has exploded over the last few years, to include everything you can imagine – and even, yes, prescriptions. You may already be familiar with our database, which locates the $4 generic program for your specific prescription at your local pharmacy. However, beyond that, we’ve done our homework on certain pharmacy’s required memberships, programs, and rates where necessary. The information is available to everyone right here, at no charge.

If your prescription is not available as a generic, or not available at a pharmacy near you, we have options in store for you! Drug makers often have prescription assistance programs, though in most cases, it is difficult to maneuver through the steps to get the help you need. Here at Medtipster, we understand that frustration and came up with a simple solution to the problem.

Medtispter.com will be implementing a new coupon database and assistance program. The endless internet search through website hoaxes and scams is over! Have you ever tried searching online for “prescription drug coupons?” The results can be a bit confusing, and can stray quite a bit away from what you were really looking to find.

We are working very hard to collect the drug manufacturer’s coupons at large, to create a database that is easy to search through and to find your specific prescription coupon. In many cases, these will save you hundreds of dollars a month! In fact, if your prescription is not available as a generic equivalent, or not available at a pharmacy near you, one click of the button to “locate coupon” will serve as relief, as well as the option to find therapeutic alternatives.

The Price is Right?

October 21, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

“Come on down!” Those are awfully familiar words to any “Price is Right” guru. Ever notice how the items being bid on are all brand names? It’s part of “branding,” and it works well if you’re targeting a fan of the CBS hit television show, even post-Bob Barker!

There’s a time and a place for brand names. I choose Kraft Macaroni and Cheese over the store brand, it’s my personal preference. Why? In my opinion, Kraft has a better product, and the difference is definitely noticeable. (Yes, it is the cheesiest!) I could save about $25 a year by choosing the store brand, which adds up to about $1,250 over my lifetime.

Now, this is crazy. The average person has one prescription per month, and the cost of the brand name prescription, on average, is $100.00. Let’s say from age 45 to age 68, a person spends this amount per month on the same brand name prescription. That’s $27,600! What? $27,600! Sorry, it was just SO worth repeating!

Now, let’s take this same person and factor in medtipster.com, where the same prescription is available in a generic form (which is an exact replica of the brand name) for only $4.00 per month. Now we’re talking! That’s just $1,104.00 over 23 years. While I’m sure you can do the math, basically the difference is, well, a new Honda Civic Hybrid, or two Kia Rios!

So you see, we’re not talking mac’n cheese any more. While “The Price is Right” for some purchases, it’s better to “come on down” on prescription drug spending.

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

Get Adobe Flash playerPlugin by wpburn.com wordpress themes