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Employers Grapple With Birth Control Mandate

May 09, 2012 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: Employee Benefit News, 5/1/12 – By, Lisa V. Gillespie

Federal contraception coverage mandate raises ire among insurers, may raise premiums for health plan members

The intersection between religion and business is a heated one, with the most recent flare-up sparked by a provision in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that mandates employers cover the cost of contraception in their health plans. Although the Obama administration exempted houses of worship from the rule, it still requires coverage be made available to employees of religiously affiliated organizations such as hospitals and universities.

The administration has said insurers should ultimately make up any initial costs by avoiding expenses associated with unintended pregnancies. But a survey of 15 large health plans shows they are dubious of such savings.

Asked what impact the requirement will have on their costs in the year to two years after it goes into effect, 40% of insurers said they expect the requirement will increase costs through higher pharmacy expenses.

The survey of pharmacy directors at the health plans was conducted by Reimbursement Intelligence, which advises pharmaceutical, medical device and other companies on reimbursement issues. The firm did not name the insurance plans it surveyed.

Of the health plans, 20% said costs would even out because they already budget for contraception in the premium, 6.7% said it would drive up pharmacy costs but decrease medical costs, while 33.3% weren’t sure. None said it would lead to net savings.

“[Insurers] think it will raise pharmacy costs and won’t lower medical costs,” says Rhonda Greenapple, chief executive officer of Reimbursement Intelligence. “The idea that preventive care is going to reduce overall health care costs, they don’t buy it.”

In addition to health insurance companies, lawmakers also have questioned the precedent set by Obama’s plan that would force insurers to pay for coverage with no clear way of recouping the expense. “The idea that insurance companies are going to provide free coverage for items contained in the administration’s order reflects a misunderstanding of the business of insurance,” says Rep. Dan Lungren (R-Calif.). “Under its ‘accommodation,’ the religious employer continues to pay premiums that contribute to the revenues of the insurers. The money paid by religious employers for what will inevitably be higher premiums thereby frees up insurer funds to pay for abortion-inducing drugs, sterilization and contraception in violation of their strongly held beliefs.”

The guidelines require insurers to do away with copayments on coverage of preventive care services for women in all new plans beginning in August. A poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation in February showed nearly two-thirds of Americans favor the policy requiring birth control coverage for female employees, including clear majorities of Roman Catholic, Protestant evangelical and independent voters. Sixty-three percent of Americans overall supported it, according to the data.

But Catholic leaders, Protestant evangelical groups, Republicans and other social conservatives rejected the compromise, saying it still violates religious freedom under the U.S. Constitution and would cause economic hardship for self-insured institutions. The controversy has spawned a rancorous debate in Congress as well as a handful of Catholic lawsuits, including a federal suit in Nebraska joined by seven U.S. states.

Employer response

Some employers have voiced support for the rule, including one reader of EBN’s blog Employee Benefit Views, who said his/her employee population consists mainly of lower-income employees “who make $10 to $15 an hour who may not use birth control – not because of religious reasons, but because they cannot afford the cost of the birth control and keep a roof over their heads. I work for a self-funded employer, and this would create additional costs for us. However, these could possibly be off-set with the savings from births, disability leaves and the like.”

That cost savings may be attractive to employers constantly looking to reduce health care cost burdens. “I understand the issue of ‘religious freedom’ here, but just because this coverage is offered by your insurance company, does not mean that you have to use it,” wrote another EBV commenter. “I would think that each adult can make their own choice on whether or not this is a benefit [they] want to use. But the coverage is there, then, for those individuals who want and need that coverage. Better than the alternative of unwanted pregnancies, abortions and the like.”

Other readers likened the coverage of contraception to coverage to treat chronic conditions. “I do understand the perspective of the employer not wanting to pay for a benefit they do not condone,” a third EBV commenter wrote. “I don’t condone many of the activities that lead to diabetes or heart disease. But I still have to pay for the people that have those habits.”

IRS adjusts rules on health insurance debit cards

December 27, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: Accounting Today, a SourceMedia publication – 12.27.2010

The Internal Revenue Service issued new guidance allowing the continued use of flexible spending arrangement and health reimbursement arrangement debit cards for the purchase of prescribed over-the-counter medicines and drugs.

The new guidance modifies previous guidance to permit taxpayers to continue using FSA and HRA debit cards to purchase over-the-counter medications for which the taxpayer has a prescription.

Effective after Jan. 15, 2011, in accordance with the new guidance, this use of debit cards must comply with procedures reflecting those that pharmacies currently follow when selling prescribed medicines or drugs.

The procedures include requirements that a prescription for the medication be presented to the pharmacy or the mail-order or web-based vendor that dispenses the medication and that proper records be retained.

In accordance with the Affordable Care Act, the cost of over-the-counter medicines or drugs can be reimbursed from a health FSA or HRA if a prescription has been obtained. The requirement to obtain a prescription does not apply to insulin.

The prescription requirement applies to purchases made on or after Jan. 1, 2011, and not to purchases made in 2010 even if reimbursed after Dec. 31, 2010. Because the requirement applies only to over-the-counter medications, it does not apply to other health care expenses such as medical devices, eye glasses or contact lenses.

The new guidance, IRS Notice 2011-5, as well as answers to frequently asked questions on IRS.gov, also contain further details on health FSA and HRA debit card purchases, including purchases from health care providers other than pharmacies and mail order and web-based vendors.

For guidance on health FSA and HRA debit card purchases at “90 percent pharmacies,” see IRS Notice 2010-59. More information on health care reform provisions can be found on the Affordable Care Act page on IRS.gov.

Steep Co-Pays May Cause Some to Abandon Prescriptions

November 17, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: HealthDay, 11.15.2010 – By Serena Gordon

In these tough economic times, even people with health insurance are leaving prescription medications at the pharmacy because of high co-payments.

This costs the pharmacy between $5 and $10 in processing per prescription, and across the United States that adds up to about $500 million in additional health care costs annually, according to Dr. William Shrank, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and lead author of a new study.

“A little over 3 percent of prescriptions that are delivered to the pharmacy aren’t getting picked up,” said Shrank. “And, in more than half of those cases, the prescription wasn’t refilled anywhere else during the next six months.”

Results of the study are published in the Nov. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Shrank and his colleagues reviewed data on the prescriptions bottled for insured patients of CVS Caremark, a pharmacy benefits manager and national retail pharmacy chain. CVS Caremark funded the study.

The study period ran from July 1, 2008 through Sept. 30, 2008. More than 10.3 million prescriptions were filled for 5.2 million patients. The patients’ average age was 47 years, and 60 percent were female, according to the study. The average family income in their neighborhoods was $61,762.

Of the more than 10 million prescriptions, 3.27 percent were abandoned.

Cost appeared to be the biggest driver in whether or not someone would leave a prescription, according to the study.

If a co-pay was $50 or over, people were 4.5 times more likely to abandon the prescription, Shrank said, adding that it’s “imperative to talk to your doctor and pharmacist to try to identify less expensive options, rather than abandoning an expensive medication and going without.”

Drugs with a co-pay of less than $10 were abandoned just 1.4 percent of the time, according to the study. People were also a lot less likely to leave generic medications at the pharmacy counter, according to Shrank.

The medications most frequently abandoned were cough, cold, allergy, asthma and skin medications, those used on an as-needed basis. Insulin prescriptions were abandoned 2.2 percent of the time, but Douglas Warda, director of pharmacy for ambulatory services at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said this might be a cost issue, but it could also be that some people are afraid to inject insulin.

The study also found that antipsychotic medications were abandoned 2.3 percent of the time.

Drugs least likely to be abandoned included opiate medications for pain, blood pressure medications, birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, and blood-thinning medications, according to the study.

Young people between the ages of 18 and 34 were the most likely to forgo their prescriptions, and new users of medications were 2.74 times more likely to leave their drugs behind.

Prescription orders that were delivered to the pharmacy electronically — via the computer — were 64 percent more likely to be abandoned than prescriptions walked into the pharmacy.

“We’re definitely not saying that e-prescribing is bad; it’s great, but there appear to be some unintended consequences,” said Shrank.

There was no way to tell if people never tried to pick up their prescriptions, or if they went to retrieve them but chose to leave them behind because of the cost.

Warda said he believes that more patients might pick up their medications if the instructions from their physicians were clearer. For example, prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors were left at the pharmacy 2.6 percent of the time. These medications reduce the amount of acid in the stomach and can help prevent heartburn or more serious problems. “If the physician message is, ‘You need to take these medications for two to three months and it will reduce your pain and help your body heal,’ fewer people might abandon these medications,” he said.

Plus, if cost is an issue for you, bring it up with your doctor ahead of time, he added. “Don’t get blindsided at the pharmacy. Always ask your physician if there’s a generic option, or if there’s something cheaper that might work just as well. Sometimes people are embarrassed to say anything, but it’s better to ask and get a medication you can afford.

“If you get to the pharmacy, and you can’t afford the medication, follow up with your doctor or ask the pharmacist if there’s a cheaper alternative,” suggested Warda.

Dependence on Prescription Drugs Rise with Costs

October 01, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: Health Care Uncovered, by Brandi Funk – 9.30.2010 (http://ow.ly/2N3Sp)

It looks like government isn’t the only thing that Americans are increasingly dependent on.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control earlier this month shows that prescription drug use in the U.S. is on the rise, with half of all Americans currently on at least one prescription drug.

Who pays for these drugs? In 2009, U.S. prescription drugs sales topped $300 billion .

Sadly, as the number of people without health insurance rise and as more insurance companies get pickier about the drugs they cover, many cannot afford to pay for these drugs.

There is no question that the rising use and cost of prescription drugs is a major cause of rising health care costs in this country so if we want affordable health care and reform, we must start here, looking for alternatives.

According to the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, generic drugs have saved Americans $734 billion in the last 10 years so ask your health care provider if switching your prescription drug to generic is a good alternative for you.

Websites such as Medtipster allow you to search for discounted generic drug programs available at pharmacies throughout the USA.

Many of these drugs are available for as little as $4 or less.

  • If your medication is available through one of these programs, you will see a list of pharmacies with pricing, in your neighborhood.
  • If your medication is not on one of the discount generic drug programs they will notify you when it is, or they will suggest a ttherapeutic drug equivalent.
  • If your medication is not available in generic form, they will search for drug brand coupons you can print and take to your local pharmacy.

Why pay more than you have to?

Other Prescription Drug Assistance Websites

http://www.xubex.com

http://www.needymeds.com

http://www.pparx.og

http://www.rxoutreach.com

Employer healthcare costs expected to rise 9% in 2011, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers

June 15, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: www.pwc.com – June 14, 2010

The nation’s employers can expect medical costs to increase by 9% in 2011, a decrease of 0.5% from the 2010 growth rate, according to the annual Behind the Numbers report published today by the PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) Health Research Institute. For the first time, the majority of the American workforce is expected to have a health insurance deductible of $400 or more, as more employers return to “indemnity style” cost-sharing by raising out-of-pocket limits, replacing co-pays with co-insurance and adding high-deductible health plans.

The Behind the Numbers report includes findings of the PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health and Well-Being Touchstone Survey of more than 700 employers from 30 industries, as well as interviews with health plan actuaries and other executives whose companies provide health insurance for 47 million American workers and their families.

Improving wellness programs and increased cost-sharing lead the planned changes employers will make in the benefit plan designs they will offer for next year. According to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Touchstone research:

  • Two-thirds (67%) of companies intend to expand or improve wellness programs inside the US
  • 42% intend to increase employee contributions for health insurance coverage.
  • 41% intend to increase medical cost-sharing, including higher deductibles and co-pays, while only 26% intend to increase prescription drug cost-sharing.
  • More employers are dropping health benefits for retirees. One-third of employers with over 5,000 workers subsidize pre-65 retiree medical coverage, down from 47% in 2009. Only 22% of employers with over 5,000 employees subsidize post-65 retiree medical coverage, down from 37% in 2009.

In 2011, the Behind the Numbers report outlines three primary deflators that will help employers hold down medical costs:

  • Employers are moving toward pre-managed care benefit design by increasing deductibles and replacing co-pays with co-insurance. By requiring workers to spend more out-of-pocket at the point of care, employers believe they will rein in utilization of services and drugs. The number of employers using co-insurance for physician visits has nearly doubled, and one-third use co-insurance for brand-name drugs.
  • Drug costs are tempered by generics. Insurers are benefitting from the growing use of generic drugs. Drugs representing about $26 billion in annual sales are expected to go off patent in 2011, including the world’s best-selling drug, Lipitor. Generics account for as much as 80% of all prescriptions.
  • COBRA costs are expected to return to more normal levels in 2011. COBRA subsidies passed by Congress in 2009 created a 1% increase in the medical cost trend, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers’ analysis. A combination of declining unemployment and expiration of the COBRA subsidies is expected to lead to reduced enrollment in COBRA.

The biggest inflators of the medical trend in 2011 will be in hospital and physician costs, which make up 81% of premium costs. 

  • Hospitals shifting costs from Medicare to private payers and employers is seen as the Number One reason for higher medical costs trends. In 2011, Medicare, which is the single largest payer for hospitals, will reduce payment rates to hospitals for the first time after seven years of increases that nearly matched or exceeded inflation increases. Some hospitals that benefitted from higher payments in 2008 and 2009 may be able to manage this type of cut by tapping their reserves. Yet, more are likely to shift more costs to commercial payers during their negotiations.
  • Provider consolidation is increasing, which is expected to increase their bargaining power. More physicians are getting out of private practice and joining forces with local hospitals or larger physician groups. The number of physicians involved in mergers or acquisitions in 2009 was 2,910, nearly twice that of 2008. There has been record consolidation activity in 2010, and PricewaterhouseCoopers expects the trend to accelerate in 2011. Payers expect to see more negotiating power and higher prices in the short term, though the benefits of consolidation should create efficiencies that moderate rate increases in the future.
  • Spurred by stimulus funding that begins in 2011 and Medicare penalties that begin in 2015, hospitals will invest billions of dollars in certified electronic health record (EHR) systems. While many hospital systems were planning to implement EHRs in the near future, the government’s new regulations dramatically condensed their timelines to invest in technology, IT staff, training and process redesign. Healthcare CIOs surveyed by PwC said they will make their largest investments to meet the new EHR regulations in 2011. In the long term, EHRs are expected to help control costs. 

“For more than 50 years, US employers have used health benefits as a critical part of their compensation package to recruit and retain workers,” said Michael Thompson, principal, Human Resource Services, PricewaterhouseCoopers. “The value of these benefits is becoming an even more visible part of overall compensation as medical costs grow, and, by 2014, health insurance benefits will shift from being a voluntary benefit to an individual mandate, enforced by new tax levies. Companies are now working with their health plan providers for new post-recession, post-health reform strategies to sustain their programs and promote health and well-being as their next competitive advantage.” 

Each year, PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute provides estimates on growth of private medical costs over the next year and what the leading drivers of the trend are expected to be. Insurance companies use medical cost trends to help set health plan premiums by estimating what the same health plan this year would cost in the next year. In turn, employers use the information to make adjustments in benefit plan design to help offset any cost increases. 

“Health reform delivers only a minor impact on the underlying medical cost trends in 2011 and introduces hundreds of changes in the healthcare system designed to reduce costs and improve efficiencies in the long-term,” said Kelly A. Barnes, US health industries leader at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “These changes could bring significant new cost savings opportunities for employers and payers as well as new choices and transparency for workers buying insurance.” 

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Behind the Numbers report and survey highlights are available at www.pwc.com/us/medicalcosts2011. The full findings of the PricewaterhouseCoopers 2010 Health and Well-being Touchstone survey are available at  www.pwc.com/us/touchstone2010.For more on the details on the implications of health reform, go to http://www.pwc.com/healthreform

Methodology

The 2010 Health and Well-Being Touchstone survey was completed in the first quarter of 2010. Survey participants included 700 U.S- based companies across the country from 30 different industries. Companies ranged in size from small employers with fewer than 500 employees to large companies with more than 20,000 employees. 

About PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute (HRI)

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute (www.pwc.com/hri) is an unparalleled resource for health industry expertise. By providing cutting-edge intelligence, perspective and analysis on issues impacting the health industry, HRI assists executive decision-makers and stakeholders worldwide in navigating their most pressing business challenges. PricewaterhouseCoopers is one of the only firms with a dedicated global healthcare research unit, capitalizing on fact-based research and collaborative exchange among our network of professionals with day-to-day experience in the health industries. 

About PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Industries Group

 PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Industries Group (www.pwc.com/healthindustries) is a leading advisor to public and private organizations across the health industry, including payers, providers, academic institutions, health sciences, biotech/medical devices, pharmaceutical companies, employers and new non-traditional market participants in the dynamic healthcare space. PricewaterhouseCoopers has a network of more than 4,000 professionals worldwide and 1,200 professionals in the US dedicated to the health industries.

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Industries’ clients include 40 of the top 100 hospitals in the US and 16 of the 18 best hospitals as ranked by US News & World Report; all 20 of the world’s major pharmaceutical companies; all of the top 20 commercial payers in the US; municipal, state and federal government agencies and many of the world’s preeminent medical foundations and associations. Follow PwC Health Industries at http://twitter.com/PwCHealth.

About PricewaterhouseCoopers
PricewaterhouseCoopers (www.pwc.com) provides industry-focused assurance, tax and advisory services to build public trust and enhance value for its clients and their stakeholders. More than 163,000 people in 151 countries across our network share their thinking, experience and solutions to develop fresh perspectives and practical advice.

“PricewaterhouseCoopers” refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP or, as the context requires, the PricewaterhouseCoopers global network or other member firms of the network, each of which is a separate and independent legal entity.

© 2010 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. All rights reserved

 Lisa Stearns
The Hubbell Group, Inc.
Tel: +1 (781) 878 8882
lstearns@hubbellgroup.com

Don’t forget to take your meds! The costs of non-adherence are staggering.

March 29, 2010 By: Jason A. Klein Category: Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Medtipster Source: www.pharmalive.com; www.vitality.net; www.att.com

Don’t forget to take your meds! The costs of non-adherence are staggering.

Jason A. Klein, Medtipster President

Life is expensive. You work for a living. Your employer offers health insurance. You’re a diabetic. Your doctor prescribes Glucophage (Metformin Hydrochloride). The average monthy cost is roughly $97.00 (or $8.99 for the generic at Rite Aid….Thanks Medtipster.com!).

Now, what happens if you forget to take or refill your medication? That’s easy. Blue Cross & Blue Shield likely saves $97.00. WRONG. The correct answer is: You get sick and the non-adherence to your medication costs on average 100 times more. According to a study published in August by the New England Healthcare Institute, non-adherence costs the U.S. $290 billion in added medical spending each year. Mortality rates are twice as high among diabetes and heart disease patients who don’t take their pills properly, it said.

A Cambridge, Mass.-based startup called Vitality Inc. took note of the New England Healthcare Institute study and is gearing up to offer an extremely innovative solution. Not only that, but they have brought along AT&T, one of the nations largest communications providers, along for the ride. Their solution: A pill bottle cap that keeps track of when and how often it is opened. If not opened according to the pre-programmed clinical specifications, you will be notified via the AT&T network. The cap can also be programmed to notify your spouse, parents, or children. You can run, but you can’t hide! We, at Medtipster, love this innovation. See full press release below:

Vitality GlowCaps Utilize AT&T Wireless Network to Improve Prescription Medication Adherence
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and DALLAS, March 23 /PRNewswire/ — Vitality, Inc. and AT&T announced today that AT&T will provide the nationwide wireless network connection for Vitality GlowCaps, intelligent pill caps designed to help patients take medications regularly, provide peace of mind for loved ones, and solve the billion-dollar adherence problem for pharmaceutical companies, retail pharmacies, and healthcare providers.
The AT&T-connected GlowCaps fit on standard prescription bottles and use light then sound reminders, which can be followed by a phone call or text message so people don’t miss a dose. Each time the pill bottle is opened adherence data is recorded and securely relayed to Vitality over the AT&T wireless network. This daily adherence information is used to compile periodic progress reports that are sent to patients, caregivers and doctors, and family members.
Using sophisticated pattern recognition, Vitality uncovers the key motivational levers for each individual, and then tailors programs to activate these levers and break through whatever barriers exist. Data generated by GlowCaps can be used to automatically refill prescriptions as pills deplete.
“For the first time in the healthcare industry, we can use minute-by-minute adherence data to motivate healthy behavior,” said David Rose, CEO of Vitality. “The AT&T wireless network enables Vitality to know when people do and don’t take their medication, then send reminder calls, compile progress reports, and refill people’s medications before they run out.”
“GlowCaps offers a very intuitive solution to an ongoing issue in the daily lives of many consumers,” said Glenn Lurie, president, AT&T Emerging Devices and Resale. “We look forward to providing the network connection for GlowCaps, delivering timely wireless data that will assist consumers in sticking with a prescription regimen, keeping them connected with doctors and family members, informed and on schedule.”
Financial terms of the agreement have not been disclosed.

Gov. Brian Schweitzer Positions to Save Montana 40% off the $100 million Spent on Prescription Drugs

March 15, 2010 By: Nadia Category: Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Medtipster Source: Associated Press / Writer: Matt Gouras

MONTANA GOVERNOR WANTS TO GET DRUGS FROM CANADA

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Gov. Brian Schweitzer said Thursday that he is seeking federal permission to import cheaper drugs from Canada for use in state insurance programs.

Schweitzer said he thinks the move could chop 40 percent off the $100 million the state spends each year on prescription drugs for Medicaid, the children’s health insurance program, state employees, and inmates at the prison.

We know we can save a lot of money,” Schweitzer said.

The governor said he envisions the state setting up a deal with a Canadian wholesaler that could mail the drugs to local pharmacies on insurance plans paid for by the state. In the case of the prison, the governor said he expects the state would order those directly.

The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said Thursday it had not yet seen Montana’s request and couldn’t comment.

Schweitzer was first involved in the issue during an unsuccessful U.S. Senate run in 2000, when he made cheap Canadian drugs a cornerstone of his platform and would take busloads of seniors north of the border to buy drugs.

The issue has been debated in Washington, D.C., over the years.

Recently, the U.S. Senate rejected a plan to let Americans import prescription drugs from abroad. Such a change would deprive drug makers of billions of dollars.

Both the pharmaceutical industry and the Obama administration also have argued that such plans would not protect people from potentially dangerous or ineffective drugs – a notion at which Schweitzer and other supporters scoff.

“These are the same drugs from the same places,” Schweitzer said of the Canadian pharmaceuticals.

Schweitzer is asking Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to exercise authority to certify the drugs to be safe, to waive Medicaid requirements that such funds only be spent within U.S. borders, and to make other allowances.

Schweitzer said he decided to move forward with the idea now because Congress has not solved the problem with health care reform and because the state is desperately looking for ways to cut costs.

“Desperate times make us desperate people,” Schweitzer said.

The governor said he hopes for a waiver within the year.

E-Prescriptions Versus Handwritten Prescriptions

February 09, 2010 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medicine Advice

Many prescriptions are transmitted electronically, however, does this mean your privacy and safety are at risk? Or is this a safer, more secure and more beneficial method of prescribing medications?

With the age of technology and electronic, well, everything, we’re seeing a lot of changes in every day life, and in every day business. We’ve seen newspaper circulations drop, paper mail decrease, and who doesn’t have an email address or a home computer?

Your physician’s office most likely has an electronic version of your medical records by now, instead of the old school manilla folders. If not, trust me, it will happen sooner versus later. There are a lot of benefits to this method, the biggest being saving trees and helping the environment. Let’s take a closer look at how this may affect the one piece of paper you typically walk out the physician’s office door with – a prescription.

E-prescriptions are the same as the hand written prescription, only computer generated by your physician. The electronic prescription is sent directly to the pharmacy of your choice. Privacy has been a key concern for many patients with this change in how prescriptions are handled, however, rest assured that the network (transmitting) between your physician’s computer and your pharmacy is a secured and private route.

E-prescribing is more efficient and is faster in most cases. Most of the time, your prescription arrives at your pharmacy before you leave your doctor’s office. It doesn’t always mean it will be ready for you when you arrive, as sometimes pharmacies are busy or you arrive before the pharmacist has had time to fill the script. But, you won’t be waiting around the pharmacy or having to leave and come back. Plus the risk of errors with traditional hand written prescriptions is almost obsolete with e-prescriptions.

Also, remember that all e-prescriptions meet the requirements of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Your medical history has always contained the record of your prescription, and it being electronic or hand written makes no difference. All medical and prescription information is protected by federal and state laws.

If you have questions about your prescription, your physician or pharmacist will be able to address your concerns. Specific questions about e-prescriptions can be answered by either professional as well. Remember if you’re unsure which pharmacy has your prescription at the lowest cost available, tell your exit nurse at your physician’s office to use Medtipster.com to find the pharmacy to transmit your e-prescription.

Look No Further: Prescription Coupons Soon Online

January 28, 2010 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

If you’re searching for savings on brand name prescriptions, our user friendly and searchable database of coupons come straight from the manufacturer.

Many people have trouble affording their prescriptions, especially those without health insurance. In fact, one single prescription for a 30-day supply can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars. I’ve heard stories of people having to choose between their medications and groceries, and it breaks my heart to think of such dilemma. No one should have to make that choice!

There are ways you can save significant amounts of money on your prescriptions, and I’m not just shouting Medtipster.com here. The growth of internet coupons has exploded over the last few years, to include everything you can imagine – and even, yes, prescriptions. You may already be familiar with our database, which locates the $4 generic program for your specific prescription at your local pharmacy. However, beyond that, we’ve done our homework on certain pharmacy’s required memberships, programs, and rates where necessary. The information is available to everyone right here, at no charge.

If your prescription is not available as a generic, or not available at a pharmacy near you, we have options in store for you! Drug makers often have prescription assistance programs, though in most cases, it is difficult to maneuver through the steps to get the help you need. Here at Medtipster, we understand that frustration and came up with a simple solution to the problem.

Medtispter.com will be implementing a new coupon database and assistance program. The endless internet search through website hoaxes and scams is over! Have you ever tried searching online for “prescription drug coupons?” The results can be a bit confusing, and can stray quite a bit away from what you were really looking to find.

We are working very hard to collect the drug manufacturer’s coupons at large, to create a database that is easy to search through and to find your specific prescription coupon. In many cases, these will save you hundreds of dollars a month! In fact, if your prescription is not available as a generic equivalent, or not available at a pharmacy near you, one click of the button to “locate coupon” will serve as relief, as well as the option to find therapeutic alternatives.

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