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The Importance Of Specialty Medication Management

January 03, 2013 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: Navitus Clinical Journal, Vol. 9 – January 2013

Approximately one to five percent of the population uses specialty medications. Nonetheless, spending for specialty medications has increased between 15 and 20% for the last several years and is expected to represent up to 40% of an employer’s total medical spend by 2020. Controlling specialty medication cost is therefore a critical focus area for plan sponsors. With more and more specialty drugs coming down the pipeline, it will be increasingly important for plan sponsors to manage this area of their drug spend.

Managing this highly complex area involves coordination among multiple parties, including plan sponsor, pharmacy benefit manager (PBM), medical administrator, specialty pharmacy and the patient.

Benefits of Specialty Drug Control
Growth in specialty spending is expected to outpace non-specialty spending due to:

  1. High proportion of newly approved drugs in the specialty market
  2. Complex and expensive manufacturing processes
  3. Limited competition within specialty medication therapy classes

It is clear that plan sponsors can benefit from managing specialty costs. While specialty medications may represent a low percentage of the drugs purchased by the plan sponsor’s members, the cost of these medications represents much more than the actual percentage of medications purchased.

In addition to cost control, helping members adhere to their regimens with specialty medications is essential, as high adherence rates have been shown to reduce hospitalizations, promote better health outcomes and lower overall health care costs.

Ways to Manage Specialty Medications

1. Implement a Mandatory Program

We recommend that plan sponsors implement a SpecialtyRx program as mandatory for members with specialty needs. Specialty programs coordinate personalized support for patients impacted by chronic and complex diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and cancer. Such diseases often require complicated medication regimens that include specialty medications. By mandating use of a specialty pharmacy vendor, plan sponsors reap the benefits of reduced drug discounts with specialty pharmacy partners (versus the typically higher retail pharmacy pricing), superior clinical oversight, and individual member case management

2. Incorporate a Split-Fill Program

A  Specialty Split-Fill Program reduces days’ supply to 15-day intervals for qualifying high-cost specialty medications that typically have high discontinuation rates within the first three months of therapy. This prevents unnecessary dispensing of two weeks of therapy, should therapy be discontinued within the first half of the first three months of a prescription. This program also allows specialty pharmacy to initiate earlier clinical interventions due to medication side effects that require dose modification or therapy discontinuation. According to the May 2012 issue of Managed Care, a health plan with about 500,000 members saved approximately $300,000 in its first year with a split-fill program.

3. Know your Specialty Costs Through Pharmacy & Medical

Plan sponsors should equip themselves with information about their specialty drug spend and track specialty costs not only through their PBM but through their medical vendor as well. Less than 20% of health plans and employers currently receive reporting from their PBMs or other health care vendors on medical specialty utilization. Given that plan sponsors identified specialty drug costs as one of their two most important outcomes for specialty management, and that 50% or more of the specialty spend resides on the medical side, this gap represents a critical area of opportunity.

4. Managed Specialty Programs relieve clients of the burden of managing their specialty populations and assume this responsibility through a comprehensive, patient-centric program that offers:

  • Built-in utilization management edits (e.g., prior authorization, step therapy) to ensure members use lower cost specialty products, where appropriate.
  • Continually negotiated lower discounts with specialty pharmacies.
  • Price increase protection built into rebate contracts for specialty drugs, where available, to account for price inflation; that is, when certain products increase in price, rebates for those products automatically increase as well.
  • Continual monitoring of new drugs entering the pipeline. Their Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee will continue to monitor and evaluate specialty drugs, including any biosimilars being released. Biosimilars are products that are chemically similar to other products; very few have received FDA approval at this point. We expect biosimilars will be significantly less expensive than their specialty brand medication alternatives and will play a bigger role in controlling specialty trend in the future.

As an example, a plan sponsor’s employee has a very expensive specialty medication. This specialty drug utilization represents less than 2% of total utilization, but accounts for, on average, half of the plan sponosor’s drug spend. The previous discount for the drug was under 20% off the average wholesale price. After its transition to a managed specialty program, the discount for this drug rose to 47% off the average wholesale price, providing a savings of more than $140,000 in the first three quarters.

How to Begin to Control Specialty

If you do not currently use a mandatory program, talk to your provider today to implement the program. Plan sponsors can reap the benefits of  preferred pricing via a specialty pharmacy, and their members can benefit from the one-on-one specialized care from the case managers available through  specialty pharmacy vendors.

Be proactive and take control of this sector of your plan’s drug spend. By maintaining a tightly managed specialty program, not only will plan sponsors benefit from reduced costs, but their members will also benefit from improved overall health.

Research on Savings from Generic Drug Use

March 09, 2012 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: US Government Accountability Office, January 31 2012

What GAO Found

Our review identified articles that used varying approaches to estimate the savings associated with generic drug use in the United States. One group of studies estimated the savings in reduced drug costs that have accrued from the use of generics. For example, a series of studies estimated the total savings that have accrued to the U.S. health care system from substituting generic drugs for their brand-name counterparts, and found that from 1999 through 2010 doing so saved more than $1 trillion. A second group of studies estimated the potential to save more on drugs through greater use of generics. For example, one study assessed the potential for additional savings within the Medicare Part D program—which provides outpatient prescription drug coverage for Medicare—and found that if generic drugs had always been substituted for the brand-name drugs studied, about $900 million would have been saved in 2007. A third group of studies estimated the effect on health care costs of using generic versions of certain types of drugs where questions had generally been raised about whether substituting generic drugs for brand-name drugs was medically appropriate. Unlike the other two groups which focused on savings on drugs only, these studies compared savings from the lower cost of generic drugs to other health care costs that could accrue from their use, such as increased hospitalizations. The studies had mixed results regarding the effect of using these generics in that some found they raised health care costs, while others found they led to cost savings.

Why GAO Did This Study

Prescription drug spending in the United States reached $307 billion in 2010—an increase of $135 billion since 2001—and comprised approximately 12 percent of all health care spending in the country. Until the early 2000s, drug spending was one of the fastest growing components of health care spending. However, since that time, the rate of increase has generally declined each year, attributable in part to the greater use of generic drugs, which are copies of approved brand-name drugs. Generic versions of brand-name drugs become available to consumers when brand-name drugs’ patents and periods of market exclusivity expire and generic manufacturers obtain approval to market their drug. The competition that brand-name drugs face from generic equivalents is associated with lower overall drug prices, particularly as the number of generic manufacturers grows and price competition among them increases. On average, the retail price of a generic drug is 75 percent lower than the retail price of a brand-name drug.

Increased use of generic drugs can partly be attributed to the regulatory framework that was established in the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984, commonly known as the Hatch-Waxman Act. The Hatch-Waxman Act facilitated earlier, and less costly, market entry of generic drugs, while protecting the patent rights of brand-name drug manufacturers, to encourage continued investment in research and development. When the act was enacted in 1984, the generic utilization rate—which is the share of all drugs dispensed that are generic—was about 19 percent. Today it is about 78 percent for drugs dispensed in retail settings, such as independent, chain, and mail-order pharmacies, as well as in long-term care facilitates. The generic utilization rate is expected to continue to grow over the next few years as a number of blockbuster drugs come off patent through 2015.

While the Hatch-Waxman Act has helped to increase the number of generic alternatives to brand-name drugs, other factors influence whether providers and consumers use generic drugs. For example, third-party payers—including private health insurance plans and public programs such as Medicare— use strategies such as tiered copayments to encourage the use of less expensive drugs within a therapeutic class, which are often generics. Also, perceptions of the safety and efficacy of generic drugs may affect their use. Thus, use of generic drugs—and the savings realized—can vary by payer as well as across therapeutic classes. You asked us to identify research completed on estimates of cost savings from the use of generic drugs in the United States. This report summarizes the findings of peer-reviewed articles, government reports, and studies by national organizations, including trade and nonprofit organizations, on this topic.

For a complete copy of the GAO report, visit: www.gao.gov/assets/590/588064.pdf

Meijer’s Free Pre-Natal Vitamin Program Fills Millionth Prescription

July 06, 2011 By: Nadia Category: Free Prescriptions, HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: prnewswire.com – 6.29.2011

Delivering a healthy dose of good news to Midwest families, Meijer announced today that its free pre-natal vitamins prescription program has filled its 1,000,000th prescription, at a cost savings of nearly $14 million to Midwest families.

The announcement, made by Hank Meijer, Co-Chairman and CEO, came as the Midwest retailer reported that its pharmacies had hit the million-mark milestone earlier this week.

Meijer gave birth to the program in May 2008 when it announced it would fill select pre-natal vitamin prescriptions at no cost to customers. The no-strings-attached program enables any customer, regardless of insurance or co-pay, to have their pre-natal prescription filled free of charge.

“Meijer has always been a strong advocate for safe and healthy families, and we’re very proud to offer a program that works to ensure the health of an expectant mother and her child,” said Meijer. “In addition, offering free pre-natal vitamins helps Midwest families cope with rising health care costs, complementing the many other ways families can save money throughout our stores.”

It has been shown that pre-natal vitamins play an important role in healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These supplements have typically been prescribed for women who have become pregnant, however, many members of the medical community believe they also play an important role for women in the months leading up to conception.

Prior to launching its free pre-natal vitamins initiative, Meijer successfully introduced a program in October 2006 offering to fill select antibiotics at no charge. That program, still in use, covers leading oral generic antibiotics with a special focus on the prescriptions most often filled for children.

The Michigan-based retailer followed up its free pre-natal program in 2010 with a similar program providing no-cost prescriptions for metformin, the most commonly prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes.

Since its inception, the Meijer free antibiotics program has filled more than seven million prescriptions, saving families almost $120 million. The free metformin program has helped nearly 500,000 people battle diabetes, at a cost savings of more than $4 million.

“In less than five years, our free antibiotics, pre-natal and diabetes prescription programs have saved our customers nearly $140 million,” said Meijer. “In total, we have helped hundreds of thousands of people throughout the Midwest receive free prescriptions to help them, and their families, lead healthier lives.”

The Meijer free pre-natal vitamins program features several well-known brands of pre-natal vitamins, including TriAdvance, Trinatal GT, Trinatal Ultra, Vol-Nate, Vol-Plus, and Vol-Tab.

Find a qualifying Meijer Pharmacy near you at www.medtipster.com!

Steep Co-Pays May Cause Some to Abandon Prescriptions

November 17, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: HealthDay, 11.15.2010 – By Serena Gordon

In these tough economic times, even people with health insurance are leaving prescription medications at the pharmacy because of high co-payments.

This costs the pharmacy between $5 and $10 in processing per prescription, and across the United States that adds up to about $500 million in additional health care costs annually, according to Dr. William Shrank, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and lead author of a new study.

“A little over 3 percent of prescriptions that are delivered to the pharmacy aren’t getting picked up,” said Shrank. “And, in more than half of those cases, the prescription wasn’t refilled anywhere else during the next six months.”

Results of the study are published in the Nov. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Shrank and his colleagues reviewed data on the prescriptions bottled for insured patients of CVS Caremark, a pharmacy benefits manager and national retail pharmacy chain. CVS Caremark funded the study.

The study period ran from July 1, 2008 through Sept. 30, 2008. More than 10.3 million prescriptions were filled for 5.2 million patients. The patients’ average age was 47 years, and 60 percent were female, according to the study. The average family income in their neighborhoods was $61,762.

Of the more than 10 million prescriptions, 3.27 percent were abandoned.

Cost appeared to be the biggest driver in whether or not someone would leave a prescription, according to the study.

If a co-pay was $50 or over, people were 4.5 times more likely to abandon the prescription, Shrank said, adding that it’s “imperative to talk to your doctor and pharmacist to try to identify less expensive options, rather than abandoning an expensive medication and going without.”

Drugs with a co-pay of less than $10 were abandoned just 1.4 percent of the time, according to the study. People were also a lot less likely to leave generic medications at the pharmacy counter, according to Shrank.

The medications most frequently abandoned were cough, cold, allergy, asthma and skin medications, those used on an as-needed basis. Insulin prescriptions were abandoned 2.2 percent of the time, but Douglas Warda, director of pharmacy for ambulatory services at the University of Chicago Medical Center, said this might be a cost issue, but it could also be that some people are afraid to inject insulin.

The study also found that antipsychotic medications were abandoned 2.3 percent of the time.

Drugs least likely to be abandoned included opiate medications for pain, blood pressure medications, birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, and blood-thinning medications, according to the study.

Young people between the ages of 18 and 34 were the most likely to forgo their prescriptions, and new users of medications were 2.74 times more likely to leave their drugs behind.

Prescription orders that were delivered to the pharmacy electronically — via the computer — were 64 percent more likely to be abandoned than prescriptions walked into the pharmacy.

“We’re definitely not saying that e-prescribing is bad; it’s great, but there appear to be some unintended consequences,” said Shrank.

There was no way to tell if people never tried to pick up their prescriptions, or if they went to retrieve them but chose to leave them behind because of the cost.

Warda said he believes that more patients might pick up their medications if the instructions from their physicians were clearer. For example, prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors were left at the pharmacy 2.6 percent of the time. These medications reduce the amount of acid in the stomach and can help prevent heartburn or more serious problems. “If the physician message is, ‘You need to take these medications for two to three months and it will reduce your pain and help your body heal,’ fewer people might abandon these medications,” he said.

Plus, if cost is an issue for you, bring it up with your doctor ahead of time, he added. “Don’t get blindsided at the pharmacy. Always ask your physician if there’s a generic option, or if there’s something cheaper that might work just as well. Sometimes people are embarrassed to say anything, but it’s better to ask and get a medication you can afford.

“If you get to the pharmacy, and you can’t afford the medication, follow up with your doctor or ask the pharmacist if there’s a cheaper alternative,” suggested Warda.

Dependence on Prescription Drugs Rise with Costs

October 01, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: Health Care Uncovered, by Brandi Funk – 9.30.2010 (http://ow.ly/2N3Sp)

It looks like government isn’t the only thing that Americans are increasingly dependent on.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control earlier this month shows that prescription drug use in the U.S. is on the rise, with half of all Americans currently on at least one prescription drug.

Who pays for these drugs? In 2009, U.S. prescription drugs sales topped $300 billion .

Sadly, as the number of people without health insurance rise and as more insurance companies get pickier about the drugs they cover, many cannot afford to pay for these drugs.

There is no question that the rising use and cost of prescription drugs is a major cause of rising health care costs in this country so if we want affordable health care and reform, we must start here, looking for alternatives.

According to the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, generic drugs have saved Americans $734 billion in the last 10 years so ask your health care provider if switching your prescription drug to generic is a good alternative for you.

Websites such as Medtipster allow you to search for discounted generic drug programs available at pharmacies throughout the USA.

Many of these drugs are available for as little as $4 or less.

  • If your medication is available through one of these programs, you will see a list of pharmacies with pricing, in your neighborhood.
  • If your medication is not on one of the discount generic drug programs they will notify you when it is, or they will suggest a ttherapeutic drug equivalent.
  • If your medication is not available in generic form, they will search for drug brand coupons you can print and take to your local pharmacy.

Why pay more than you have to?

Other Prescription Drug Assistance Websites

http://www.xubex.com

http://www.needymeds.com

http://www.pparx.og

http://www.rxoutreach.com

Almost Half of Americans Took a Prescription Drug in Past Month

September 03, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: Health Blog – Wall Street Journal Blogs, By Katherine Hobson – 9.02.10

The government today released some new stats on prescription-drug use through 2008. The headline finding: Over the previous decade, the proportion of Americans (of all ages) reporting they took a prescription drug in the past month rose to 48% from 44%.

Some other key findings:

The percentage of people reporting the use of multiple prescription drugs in the last month also rose, to 31% for two or more prescriptions and 11% (a near-doubling of the previous 6%)) for five or more drugs.

As you’d expect, prescription-drug use varied by age, with about 20% of kids under 12 and 90% of older Americans (defined as age 60 and over — sorry, Mom!) reporting the use of at least one drug in the past month.

Among the 60-plus crowd, more than 76% used at least two drugs in the past month and 37% used at least five. Of that finding — which stems, of course, from the fact that older folks often have multiple diseases — the report says that “excessive prescribing or polypharmacy is also an acknowledged safety risk for older Americans, and a continuing challenge that may contribute to adverse drug events, medication compliance issues and increased health-care costs.”

The type of drugs used most often were asthma meds for kids, central nervous system stimulants (such as those used to treat ADHD) for teens, antidepressants for the middle-aged and cholesterol-lowering drugs for older people.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the trade association for drug makers, said in a statement that “as we learn more about disease, prescription medicines are justifiably playing an increasingly important role.” The group noted that many patients still lack access to needed medications, and that in many cases early interventions and improved compliance would improve health outcomes. “The best solution for all patients is to strike the right medical balance between proper and effective use of prescription medicines and other therapies and interventions,” it said.

A few months back, the pharmacy-benefits manager Medco issued its own figures for prescription-drug use and spending, covering 2009. It reported that use among adults held fairly steady, edging up slightly among those over 65 and dropping a bit for those aged 50-64 — but use among those 19 and under rose by 5%.

Generic Drug Delay Fight May Be Nearing Turning Point

June 21, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Generic Drug Delay Fight May Be Nearing Turning Point, FTC’s Leibowitz Says
06/21/2010
www.Medtipster.com Source: Bloomberg News – Washington DC Bureau

The U.S. government’s decade-long fight to limit drugmakers’ ability to keep generic medicines off the market may reach “a turning point” soon, Federal Trade Commission Chairman Jonathan Leibowitz said.

The FTC is counting on a review by an appeals court to break a deadlock over agreements made by brand-name drugmakers that it says delay the introduction of lower-priced generic medicines. The focus is on the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York, which may decide by August whether to review a deal between Bayer AG and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.’s Barr unit on when a generic version of the antibiotic Cipro can go on the market.

The Cipro case “signals a renewed concern about these pay-for-delay deals, and hopefully it will mark a turning point towards a legal rule that prohibits brand pharmaceutical companies from paying off their generic competitors to sit it out,” Leibowitz, 52, said in an interview. The review could bring the issue of agreements before the Supreme Court.

The fight pits drugmakers against the FTC, the Justice Department, pharmacies such as CVS Caremark Corp. and President Barack Obama, who cited the greater availability of generic drugs as a way to reduce health-care costs. There also is an effort in Congress to restrict the settlements.

Licensing Deals

The FTC contends brand-name makers offer generic-drug companies licensing rights on a product or other compensation in exchange for an agreement on when cheaper drugs are introduced. The agency said it supports settlements, except when there is some sort of financial consideration.

Medicines that generate about $92 billion in sales will face generic competition through 2014 because of expiring patents, according to the research firm IMS Health Inc. Medicines accounted for $250.3 billion in U.S. sales for brand- name drugmakers in 2009 and $35.8 billion for generic firms, according to Norwalk, Connecticut-based IMS.

Defending valid patents is vital, said Jerry Pappert, general counsel of Frazer, Pennsylvania-based Cephalon Inc. “If the branded company loses, it loses its franchise.”

Cephalon is being sued by the FTC, which contends the drugmaker paid more than $200 million for generic companies to drop their challenge to patents on its sleep-disorder drug Provigil. Cephalon says the settlements are in accordance with patent law.

No Delay

In the Cipro case, CVS and other pharmacies said Bayer paid $398.1 million for Barr to drop its patent challenge. David Stark, general counsel for Teva’s North America unit, said generic-drug makers aren’t delaying marketing products as a result of financial incentives. The agreements are no different than patent deals in other industries, he said.

Leibowitz said the agreements add to health-care costs. If some settlements between companies aren’t prohibited, “you’re going to pay seven, eight, 10 times as much as you otherwise would,” he said. The FTC said the deals cost consumers $3.5 billion annually, a figure disputed by economists such as Jonathan Orszag, senior managing director at the economic consulting firm Compass Lexecon in Washington and the brother of White House Budget Director Peter Orszag.

Courts have allowed the settlements as long as they don’t prevent entry of the generic beyond a patent’s lifespan.

In the Cipro case, the agreement allowed a generic drug to be sold six months before the patent expired, said Kathleen Jaeger, chief executive officer of the Generic Pharmaceutical Association, a Washington trade group.

‘Tremendous Value’

“The FTC doesn’t see the tremendous value the patent settlements have brought to the system,” she said.

Since February, courts have thrown out antitrust lawsuits over Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.’s blood-thinner Plavix and AndroGel, a testosterone ointment now made by Abbott Laboratories. The FTC lost a case over a settlement involving Schering-Plough Corp.’s K-Dur heart medication.

A three-judge panel in April upheld the Cipro settlement, though it recommended opponents seek a review by the full court.

The potential court review, along with legislation Leibowitz predicted Congress would pass this year, add momentum to efforts to limit deals. Senators Herb Kohl, a Wisconsin Democrat, and Charles Grassley, an Iowa Republican, introduced an anti-deal measure. House legislation would bar the settlements.

‘Winds Are Shifting’

“The winds are shifting on the legal front, shifting on the commission front and on the legislative front,” said Robert Doyle, a former FTC official.

Ken Johnson, a senior vice president at the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, a Washington trade group, said brand-name drug companies need patent protection to justify the investments required to develop medicines. Drugmakers said the settlements also provide certainty as to when generics will enter the market.

Stark said a court review may not be significant.

“I don’t think it’s a foregone conclusion just because they take it up that they reverse the trend,” he said.

Marcy Funk, a spokeswoman for Leverkusen, Germany-based Bayer, declined to comment.

All parties are watching if the 2nd Circuit agrees to hear the Cipro case. The decision may come in August, said David Balto, a lawyer representing consumer groups.

Leibowitz said he believes the FTC has a strong hand. “I have yet to see an issue that’s as black and white,” he said.

The 2nd Circuit case is In Re Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride Antitrust Litigation, 05-2851 and 05-2852, 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals (New York).

June 11, 2010 By: Jason A. Klein Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Towers Watson Survey: Employer Health Cost Rate Increases to Slow to 6.5% This Year, Medtipster reports.

March 02, 2010 By: Nadia Category: Medtipster

Medtipster Source: Towers Watson (NYSE, NASDAQ: TW), 2/22/2010, www.towerswatson.com and www.businessgrouphealth.org

NEW YORK — The continuing sluggish economy is forcing a growing number of large U.S. employers to take more aggressive measures to control rising health care costs and motivate workers to take charge of improving their own health, according to a survey conducted by Towers Watson, a global professional services company, and the National Business Group on Health (NBGH), a non-profit association of large U.S. employers.

Survey findings

  • 83% of companies have already revamped or expect to revamp their health care strategy within the next two years, up from 59% in 2009.
  • Costs are expected to increase 6.5% this year, down slightly from 7% in 2009.
  • 67% of employers identify employees’ poor health habits as a top challenge to maintaining affordable benefit coverage.

Employee Engagement

  • 58% of employers indicate the biggest obstacle to changing employees’ health-related behavior is the lack of employee engagement.
  • 31% say there is a lack of sufficient financial incentives to encourage participation
  • 30% say there is a lack of an adequate health management program budget.

Employee Incentives and On-site Health Centers

  • 66% plan to offer incentives for employees to complete a health risk appraisal, up from 61% in 2009.
  • 56% of employers now offer health coaches, and
  • 26% now offer onsite health centers.

Vendors Can Do Better

  • 67% of companies feel that vendors fall short with programs designed to change member behavior to drive more efficient use of health care services.
  • 66% identify vendor programs designed to change member behavior related to making healthy lifestyle decisions as not at all or only slightly effective.
  • 57% of employers also consider vendors not at all or only slightly effective at driving care to high-quality providers.

“The downturn has amplified the pressure on companies to find ways to support effective health management programs under budget constraints,” said Ron Fontanetta, senior consultant at Towers Watson. “For employers, the current environment is a clarion call to adjust their health plan strategy, reassess vendor relationships and aggressively address the challenge to encourage workers to become better advocates for their own health.” 

“Even in tight times, employers will continue to encourage healthy behaviors with financial incentives and other initiatives,” said Ted Nussbaum, senior consultant at Towers Watson. “However, there are challenges to changing employee behavior that extend beyond budget constraints and employer-sponsored programs. Inspiring workers to be actively involved in their own health remains an uphill battle for most companies.”

About the National Business Group on Health/Towers Watson Report

The 15th Annual National Business Group on Health/Towers Watson Employer Survey on Purchasing Value in Health Care was conducted from November 2009 through January 2010 with 507 employers of 1,000 or more employees that collectively employ 11.5 million workers. The full report will be available in March.

About Towers Watson

Towers Watson (NYSE, NASDAQ: TW) is a leading global professional services company that helps organizations improve performance through effective people, risk and financial management. The company offers solutions in the areas of employee benefits, talent management, rewards, and risk and capital management. Towers Watson has 14,000 associates around the world.  Visit www.towerswatson.com.

About the National Business Group on Health

The National Business Group on Health is a non-profit membership organization of more than 280 members, including 60 of the Fortune 100. The National Business Group on Health is devoted to providing practical solutions to its employer-members’ most important health care problems and serving as the voice for large employers on national health care issues and public policy. Its members purchase health and disability benefits for over 55 million people. Visit www.businessgrouphealth.org.

Do You Have Questions About Generics!

July 01, 2009 By: PharmaSueAnn Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

A recent survey out of California indicates that about 30% of “… respondents did not know or believe that generics have the same active ingredients and effectiveness as brand name drugs.”

Generics can a be a cost effective opportunity to lower you overall health care costs. If you are uncertain if a generic is right for you. PharmaSueAnn says: Contract you local neighborhood pharmacist to discuss your personal needs.

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