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Try Local Drugstore For Faster Refund On Recalled Kids’ Medicines

May 13, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: NPR Health Blog – Scott Hensley, 5.6.2010

If you’ve rooted around your medicine chest and found some of the kids’ Tylenol, Motrin, Benadryl or Zyrtec recalled by Johnson & Johnson, what should you do?

The company’s McNeil unit says it will give you a refund, but you have to fill out a form online. Oh, and you also have to be available for a chat, in case a company rep wants to call and verify the info.

The New York Times’ Ron Lieber ripped J&J for not being better prepared and for not telling people sooner that refunds would be an option. The early advice was just to toss the stuff out.

On a listserv for families in our D.C. suburb, one helpful mom said she’d had good luck with the local CVS drugstore, which would even take back the affected medicines without a receipt.

We called CVS HQ in Rhode Island, where spokesman Mike DeAngelis told us the chain would, as is its usual policy, give cash refunds if a customer has a receipt. Without one, you get store credit in the form of a CVS gift card.

What if some of the medicine has been used? Doesn’t matter, he said. Bring in what you’ve got. So far, he said, the returns haven’t been all that heavy. CVS has already cleared its shelves of the affected medicines, and the computerized cash registers won’t let you buy any either.

We emailed rival chain Walgreens, but haven’t heard back yet. The company did post a letter it got from McNeil on what to do with the recalled remedies, though.

Update: OK, we just talked to Robert Elfinger, a spokesman for Walgreens, and you can take your recalled meds back to them for a refund, too.

“Bring the bottle back to the store, whether it’s full, or halfway full,” he just told us. “We’ll take it back and give the customer store credit.” If you’ve got the receipt, Walgreens will give you cash.

Locate a CVS Pharmacy or Walgreens closest to your home on Medtipster.com

CVS Caremark Research Illustrates How Innovative Pharmacy Benefit Plan Design Optimizes Generic Utilization

March 11, 2010 By: Jason A. Klein Category: Free Prescriptions, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

Medtipster Source: CVS Caremark (NYSE: CVS), 10/13/2009, http://info.cvscaremark.com/newsroom

This is an old release from November 2009, BUT I really liked it and have been meaning to post it for some time now.  The message of the CVS Caremark release and the study is: We as an industry need to advise benefit payors to focus on changing consumer utilization behavior rather than  shifting cost. This study took 15,000 people, gave them a $0.00 copay on generic medications. What happened? Overall plan costs decreased due to a GDR (generic dispensing rate) increase and therapy compliance/adherence increased in key classes (antihyperlipidemics, antihypertensives, antidiabetics). WOW…who would have thought that by giving away the cow, you could pay for the milk…

WOONSOCKET, R.I., Oct. 13 /PRNewswire/ — CVS Caremark (NYSE: CVS) presented data at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) Annual Educational Conference, which illustrates how innovative pharmacy benefit plan design can impact generic utilization. The study further underscores how pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) can work with plan sponsors to manage costs and improve health outcomes by working to change plan participant behavior through increased engagement. The study found that implementing a $0 copay structure for generic medications can be an effective strategy to increase generic dispensing, with the generic dispensing rate (GDR) increasing to 60.8 percent (a 4.2 percent increase) during the study period.

“Our 2009 Benefit Planning Survey found that clients are more interested in identifying opportunities to change plan participant behavior, rather than shift costs,” said Jack Bruner, Executive Vice President, CVS Caremark. “The data presented at AMCP illustrates an example of how we can work with our plan sponsors to change and optimize participant behavior in order to achieve increased generic utilization. These types of partnerships enable us to effectively reduce costs for both our client and their plan participants without compromising quality or access.”

In addition to an improvement in GDR during the study period, the analysis found that the average participant cost share for generic medications decreased almost 10 percent (9.4 percent decrease). In addition, the average plan cost per 30 days of therapy also exhibited a slight decline, despite the reduction in generic copayment rates. Prevalence of use in three key preventative drug classes also increased significantly (participants on cholesterol lowering therapy increased 13 percent, on antihypertensive therapy increased seven percent and on diabetic therapy increased nine percent) as a proportion of eligible patients.

“While some plan designs work to drive generic utilization by increasing brand medication copayments, this study demonstrates that lowering the generic copayment can also be an effective strategy to increase GDR,” said Mr. Bruner. “In addition, the data indicates that lowering the generic copayment may also be associated with an increase in participants taking key preventative drugs, which could positively impact adherence and overall health outcomes.”

The study was designed to evaluate the results of plan design changes, including implementation of a $0 copay for generic medications, on the GDR, plan participant cost and impact of plan participant behavior changes on health outcomes. During the study period, participants were allowed to fill prescriptions for generic medications at a preferred retail pharmacy network at a zero dollar copay. The study included 15,000 plan participants covered by a self-funded employer group who were continuously enrolled under the benefit for the duration of the study period (12/1/2007 through 7/31/2009). 

Uninsured Numbers Rising!

October 06, 2009 By: Nadia Category: Medtipster, Prescription News

Nádia - your personal pharmacy cost adviser

Nádia - your personal pharmacy cost adviser

The number of uninsured nationwide rose to 46.3 million in 2008, up 1.3% from 45.7 million the prior year, with 15.4% of the total population uninsured, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Our goal is to provide a road map for the 15.4% that have no insurance. Medtipster.com is the best way to find medications at the right price. Whether it’s CVS Pharmacy, Kroger Pharmacy, Target Pharmacy, Kmart Pharmacy, Meijers Pharmacy, Walmart Pharmacy, Rite-Aid, Spartan Pharmacy, etc… The choice is yours! Medtipster offers the information, you do the rest.

Find your nearest Pharmacy by using medtipster.com

CVS/pharmacy Celebrates Grand Opening of its 7,000th Store

September 25, 2009 By: Nadia Category: Medtipster, Prescription News

Nádia - your personal pharmacy cost adviser CVS/pharmacy opened its 7,000th store in Little Canada, Minnesota. As part of the grand opening, Larry Merlo, President of CVS/pharmacy, announced details of a CVS plan to offer $75,000 worth of free seasonal flu shots to the unemployed in Minneapolis-St. Paul. The effort is part of CVS Caremark’s nationwide campaign to provide $3 million in free flu shots to unemployed Americans across the country. The 2,500 vouchers for free seasonal flu shots will be distributed in collaboration with Minnesota’s DEED beginning in October in an effort to keep this at-risk population healthy this flu season.

Find this CVS location and one closest to you by using medtipster.com

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