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Lipitor Goes Generic, As Good as Crestor, But Pfizer Markets to Extend Brand Revenues

December 12, 2011 By: Nadia Category: Cholesterol, HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: USA Today, 11/15/2011

On November 30, 2011, the cholesterol medication Lipitor (atorvastatin) converted to generic status. For the first six months, two companies, Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Ranbaxy Laboratories, Ltd., will produce the generic. After May 2012, several generic manufacturers are expected to enter the market.

Pfizer Inc., the maker of Lipitor is marketing hard for people to keep buying its brand-name version for the next 6 months. Pfizer is offering

  • patients a discount card to get Lipitor for $4 a month, and
  • rebates to insurance companies that cover Lipitor for the next 6 months.

This action by Pfizer will result in the costs of Lipitor being below generic prices and Pfizer will get 70% of the proceeds from one of the two versions sold now.

USA Today reported, that large doses of Lipitor and Crestor did about equally well according to a study of 1,385 patients presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Orlando. Crestor, made by AstraZeneca, “will be the last major statin not on patent,” said Cam Patterson, chief of cardiology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, who was not involved in the study. “The market for Crestor will go close to zero.”

Study findings

At the end of the two-year study,

  • Two-thirds of patients had less plaque in their arteries.
  • Both statins shrunk the size of plaque in the coronary artery by about 1%.
  • Patients on Crestor had a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) level of 63 milligrams per deciliter, while those who took Lipitor had a level of 70.
  • Patients on Crestor had a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level of 50 milligrams per deciliter, compared to 49 for those who took Lipitor.

Nehal Mehta, a cardiologist with the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Medicine, says there’s no way to know if such a small change actually matters, in terms of preventing heart attacks and saving lives. And relatively few patients would even benefit that much. Only about 20% of patients are taking such high doses — 40 milligrams daily of Crestor or 80 milligrams daily of Lipitor, says Mehta, who wasn’t involved in the study.

Such minor differences in cholesterol levels are unlikely to affect heart disease risk, Patterson says. “The bottom line is that there isn’t a difference” between drugs,” he says. “You should make your decision on other factors, like which one is least expensive.”

About Lipitor and Crestor

Cholesterol medications are the leading class of prescription drugs in the USA, with 255 million prescriptions a year. Lipitor — the country’s best-selling drug, with sales of $7.2 billion last year — will be available as a generic Dec. 1, at a fraction of its current cost. Patterson says there will be no reason for insurance plans to pay for Crestor — the eighth-leading drug in the USA, with $3.8 billion in annual sales. In fact, by next month, nearly all statins will be available generically. Generics now account for 78% of all retail prescriptions sold, according to IMS Health.

Are statins overprescribed for low-risk patients?

January 26, 2011 By: Nadia Category: Cholesterol, HealthCare, Medicine Advice, Medtipster, Prescription News

www.Medtipster.com Source: Boston Globe – 1.24.2011

It’s a common scenario: A 60-year-old woman is told she has high cholesterol but has no other risk factors for heart disease like high blood pressure, diabetes, or a smoking habit. Should she take a statin to lower her cholesterol?

Many doctors say, why not? But a review study by the Cochrane Collaboration, a nonprofit research organization, suggests otherwise. The review, which analyzed 14 trials involving the use of statins to prevent heart disease in low-risk patients, found only “limited evidence” that the drugs provide significant benefits, especially in women, and urged that “caution should be taken when prescribing statins” to prevent heart disease.

The cholesterol-lowering drugs – which include atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor), and simvastatin (Zocor) – have clearly been shown to reduce heart attacks, strokes, and deaths in higher risk patients such as those with diabetes or established heart disease. And they have minimal side effects.

In fact, the American Heart Association recommends that low-risk patients with high cholesterol consider taking a statin if lifestyle changes, such as increased exercise or weight loss, don’t work to bring cholesterol levels down.

But the Cochrane review study – written by British researchers – calls that practice into question, highlighting “shortcomings” in studies that found clear benefits in anyone who took statins to lower high cholesterol levels.

“The potential adverse effects of statins among people at low risk of [cardiovascular disease] CVD are poorly reported and unclear,” the authors wrote.

Other experts, though, disagree. “I think they make grand pronouncements that are wrong,” says Dr. Chris Cannon, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital who participated in another recent review study of statin use in low-risk patients published in the November issue of Lancet. (Cannon has accepted research grants from statin manufacturers and served on an advisory board for Bristol-Myers Squibb, which makes the statin Pravachol.)

The Lancet study found that high-risk and low-risk patients who take statins to lower their cholesterol can reduce their risk of having a heart attack, stroke, or heart procedure by 25 percent.

In absolute risk terms, statin users who don’t have heart disease would lower their yearly risk of having heart complications from 1.8 percent to 1.4 percent. Those who have already been diagnosed with heart disease would lower their yearly risk from 5.6 percent to 4.5 percent – and those with type 2 diabetes from about 5 percent to about 4 percent.

The lower your heart disease risk, the smaller the benefits you’ll receive from statins. That means the risk of side effects will play a greater role in determining whether you should take the drug. The Cochrane report found that statins didn’t increase the risk of cancer and posed a small risk of rhabdomyolysis, a serious condition involving the breakdown of muscles.

The biggest side effect, severe muscle soreness, occurs in about 3 to 5 percent of users, though some research indicates the incidence may be higher in women and for those who take higher doses or more potent statins.

It’s Creative, It’s Unique, It’s Going to Cost How Much?

October 23, 2009 By: Tylar Masters Category: Medtipster, Prescription Savings

Tylar Masters

Tylar Masters

Healthcare Awareness Campaigns, A Look Into the Future

Tom Brady of the New England Patriots wore pink Nike shoes during the October 4th home game versus the Baltimore Ravens. Other NFL players honored October’s Breast Cancer Awareness month by wearing pink gloves, sweatbands and using pink towels.

The shoes, in particular, interest me. DeAngelo Williams, running back for my favorite team, the Carolina Panthers, came up with the idea for the pink Nike cleats because an NFL player’s cleats are so vital to their success on the field, much like breast cancer awareness is vital to the success of finding a cure. Williams’ mother suffers from breast cancer and her three sisters have all fallen victim to the disease.

Since the dominant audience of an NFL game is male, I imagine that by adding anything to do with breasts to the mix will raise some interest. I have to say, what a fantastic offensive play by Susan Komen for the cure!

This is one example of how creating a unique campaign for raising awareness about healthcare issues is extremely effective. Other similar campaigns you’ve probably seen are American Heart Association and Campbell Soup’s Go Red for Women, walks for the different causes such as autism or diabetes, red ribbons for AIDS awareness, as well as thousands of Facebook pages for different causes like Parkinson’s Disease, Lou Gehrig’s, Multiple Sclerosis, etc.

Every awareness campaign shares one major issue in common: the need for a cure. A cure in most cases means a prescription. While pharmaceutical companies are hard at work in trials desperately trying to find a formula that will cure many illnesses, they are already dispensing formulas that will cure and/or relieve symptoms of other illnesses, such as strep throat, high cholesterol and depression. Many Americans are dependent on these drugs in their daily lives to suppress symptoms, and others are in need of these drugs when they become sick. (Have you ever tried to “wait out” a cold? It’s terrible!)

Diseases and illnesses don’t care who you are, what insurance you have, how much money you make, how much money is in your savings or retirement fund, how old you are, your gender, your status on facebook… I think you get my point. With the current state of healthcare, prescription drugs need to be affordable.

Where one awareness campaign ends, another one begins. We need to raise awareness about healthcare and prescription drug costs. Because when there finally is a cure, will we be able to afford it?

For more information on DeAngelo Williams’ breast cancer awareness foundation, visit www.deangelowilliams34.com.

Tylar Masters
Manager of Marketing and Communications
Medtipster, LLC.
email: tmasters@medtipster.com
web address: www.medtipster.com

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