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Generic Drug Prices Drop, Brand Prices Continue Rising

May 25, 2010 By: Nadia Category: HealthCare, Medtipster, Prescription News, Prescription Savings

www.Medtipster.com Source: FDAnews.com – Washington Drug Letter, 5.25.2010

AARP: Generic Drug Prices Drop, Brand Prices Continue Rising

The prices of brand-name prescription drugs most often used by Medicare beneficiaries increased nearly 10 percent over the 12-month period ending in March, an AARP report says.

While generic drug prices fell during the April 2009 to March 2010 period, the average price of top brand drugs used by Medicare beneficiaries rose 9.7 percent, continuing an upward trend in annual drug price increases, according to the AARP Public Policy Institute Rx Watchdog Report released last week.

Prices of generic drugs most widely used by Medicare beneficiaries dropped 9.7 percent while prices for widely used specialty drugs rose by 9.2 percent.
“These trends resulted in an average annual rate of increase of 5.3 percent for manufacturer drug prices during the 12 months ending with the first quarter of 2010 despite an extremely low rate of general inflation for all consumer goods and services,” the report says.

Drug companies raised the price of about two-thirds (90 of 144) of specialty drugs studied in the one-year period. Two of the 144 specialty drugs had a drop in price, and both were generics. For an individual taking one specialty medication, the average annual increase in cost of therapy rose by $2,760 during the study period.

AARP’s analysis echoes that of pharmacy benefit managerExpress Scripts’ 2009 Drug Trend Report, released last month. Prices of drugs in the most popular therapeutic classes increased 9.1 percent in 2009, according to that report.

PhRMA, however, said the AARP report is misleading and based on incomplete information. The report fails to take into account discounts and rebates generally negotiated between drug manufacturers and payers, which can significantly lower the cost of brand-name medicines, ultimately benefiting patients, Senior Vice President Ken Johnson said.

“Also, the report’s conclusions ignore the reality that prescription medicines represent a small and decreasing share of growth in overall health care costs in the United States,” Johnson said. “Not only is the current rate of growth for prescription medicines historically low, but the recent decline in drug spending growth has contributed to the lowest rate of total health care growth in almost 50 years.”

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